Language school – Eart Documents http://eartdocuments.com/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 10:13:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://eartdocuments.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-07-01T001347.882.png Language school – Eart Documents http://eartdocuments.com/ 32 32 COVID-19 Worsens Texas Fight to Teach Students Who Learn English https://eartdocuments.com/covid-19-worsens-texas-fight-to-teach-students-who-learn-english/ https://eartdocuments.com/covid-19-worsens-texas-fight-to-teach-students-who-learn-english/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/covid-19-worsens-texas-fight-to-teach-students-who-learn-english/ Sign up for The Brief, our daily newsletter that keeps readers up to date with the most essential Texas news. Six months ago, 16-year-old Jeffrey Flores arrived in Fort Worth with his family not knowing a word of English, but knowing it would be one of the first things to face in his new country. […]]]>


Source link

]]>
https://eartdocuments.com/covid-19-worsens-texas-fight-to-teach-students-who-learn-english/feed/ 0
Board of Directors Reviews Policy on Public Participation in Meetings | News, Sports, Jobs https://eartdocuments.com/board-of-directors-reviews-policy-on-public-participation-in-meetings-news-sports-jobs/ https://eartdocuments.com/board-of-directors-reviews-policy-on-public-participation-in-meetings-news-sports-jobs/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 04:57:56 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/board-of-directors-reviews-policy-on-public-participation-in-meetings-news-sports-jobs/ The Williamsport area school board discussed this week the policy allowing public participation in meetings. A review of the policy would allow stakeholders to comment publicly as well as residents and taxpayers. At least one board member said the policy needs to be revised to define what constitutes a stakeholder. School principal Jane Penman said […]]]>

The Williamsport area school board discussed this week the policy allowing public participation in meetings.

A review of the policy would allow stakeholders to comment publicly as well as residents and taxpayers.

At least one board member said the policy needs to be revised to define what constitutes a stakeholder.

School principal Jane Penman said she was having issues with a non-resident in the district using time that should be booked for a resident to be heard.

The board decided to defer the matter to its next meeting.

In other areas, school principals have taken action on a number of staff positions.

The board accepted the following resignations:

• Brittney N. Reese, part-time administrative support, Jackson Primary School.

• Danielle L. Gottschall, part-time food worker, Curtin Intermediate School.

• Susan M. Wood, Sign Language Interpreter Assistant, High School.

• Booker T. Riddick IV, part-time aide, college.

The Board approved the employment of the following staff:

• Alexandra C. Sheppard, Temporary Teacher, Lycoming Valley Intermediate School, annual salary $ 52,582 (prorated, effective October 6).

• Kristin L. Myers, Temporary College Teacher, annual salary of $ 55,645 (pro rata, effective October 20).

• Blake Lambert, long-term substitute teacher, CTE Business and Computer Information Technology, high school, $ 55,645 annual salary.

• Sarah E. Rhône, long-term substitute, college, $ 52,582 annual salary.

• Jaquille E. Drummond, Intervention Specialist, Lycoming Valley Intermediate School, $ 23,970.

• Sara L. Geyer, assistant, Cochran primary school.

• Bobbi J. Mitstifer, part-time aide, college.

• Melissa S. Martin, part-time aide, college.

The board approved the following staff for coaching positions:

• Dominique N. Thomas and Jakob E. Bower, eighth grade female basketball players.

• Ronald E. Sahm, seventh year female basketball player.

• Dana L. Smith, women’s basketball volunteer.

Superintendent Dr Timothy Bowers said there were a number of job postings in the district and encouraged people to apply for positions.

“We need more employees” he said.

The board of directors met in executive session to consider personnel and legal matters.

The latest news today and more in your inbox


Source link

]]>
https://eartdocuments.com/board-of-directors-reviews-policy-on-public-participation-in-meetings-news-sports-jobs/feed/ 0
OSU partners with Catholic Charities to resettle Afghan refugees https://eartdocuments.com/osu-partners-with-catholic-charities-to-resettle-afghan-refugees/ https://eartdocuments.com/osu-partners-with-catholic-charities-to-resettle-afghan-refugees/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 16:47:46 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/osu-partners-with-catholic-charities-to-resettle-afghan-refugees/ Wednesday, October 6, 2021 Media contact: Shannon Rigsby | Public Information Officer | 405-744-9081 | shannon.rigsby@okstate.edu Oklahoma State University has partnered with Catholic Charities of Eastern Oklahoma (CCEOK) to help relocate and settle up to 40 Afghan families who were evacuated by the United States government after the fall of the Afghan government. CCEOK was […]]]>

Wednesday, October 6, 2021

Media contact: Shannon Rigsby | Public Information Officer | 405-744-9081 | shannon.rigsby@okstate.edu

Oklahoma State University has partnered with Catholic Charities of Eastern Oklahoma (CCEOK) to help relocate and settle up to 40 Afghan families who were evacuated by the United States government after the fall of the Afghan government.

CCEOK was informed in early September that assistance was needed to relocate evacuees to the Stillwater area. OSU and CCEOK are working together to provide support to these families.

The first batch of Afghan refugees will arrive on campus in early November and will be housed in around 25 unoccupied residential units. While the full needs of families are still not certain, CCEOK and OSU strive to provide ESL training through the English Language and Intercultural Center, transportation by the OSU community bus network, programs for adults and children through the Family Resource Center. , assistance with food and furniture drives, and volunteer translation services offered by international student groups and others at OSU.

Want to volunteer?
OSU is asking for help from the Cowboy family to help with a warm community welcome for these families. Faculty, staff and volunteers from student organizations are needed to support the Afghan Family Project – Stillwater. Sign up to help.

Donations needed

These families, many with young children, arrive with nothing but clothes on their backs. CCEOK is looking for housewares, monetary donations and gift cards to provide long term help to these families. Item categories include: furniture, dishes, linens, toiletries, cleaning supplies, and more. Donate now.

A website has been established to provide ongoing updates, answer frequently asked questions, and coordinate support as needed for this project. You can find out more at global.okstate.edu/afghan-project/index.html.

CCEOK is the lead agency for the Afghan Families-Stillwater project. OSU’s response is led by the School of Global Studies and Partnerships and includes coordination with OSU academic and auxiliary departments, including student affairs, residential life, parking, and public transportation. of OSU and others.

Questions about the project can be directed to Dr. Randy Kluver, Dean of the School of Global Studies and Partnerships, at sgsp@okstate.edu or 405-744-6606.


Source link

]]>
https://eartdocuments.com/osu-partners-with-catholic-charities-to-resettle-afghan-refugees/feed/ 0
Sexual abuse survivors speak out for more education https://eartdocuments.com/sexual-abuse-survivors-speak-out-for-more-education/ https://eartdocuments.com/sexual-abuse-survivors-speak-out-for-more-education/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 04:51:09 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/sexual-abuse-survivors-speak-out-for-more-education/ Among more than a dozen activists demanding better education in schools on sexual abuse, survivors told their stories, issuing an ultimatum to lawmakers to prevent more children from being victimized. “Just as we teach addition and subtraction, we need to teach children to express themselves,” said Alicia Zimov, a survivor of her father’s sexual abuse […]]]>

Among more than a dozen activists demanding better education in schools on sexual abuse, survivors told their stories, issuing an ultimatum to lawmakers to prevent more children from being victimized.

“Just as we teach addition and subtraction, we need to teach children to express themselves,” said Alicia Zimov, a survivor of her father’s sexual abuse with her sister. “They need to know that they are not alone; they are not at fault; and they won’t get into trouble.

For Zimov and other survivors of sexual abuse, a bill before the Ohio Senate is an opportunity to educate, empower and end sexual abuse by reaching out to students in schools and schools. teachers who might report abuse if they knew the signs. .

House Bill 105 was introduced in April and, if passed, would require public school districts, community schools and STEM schools to provide ‘age appropriate education’ in sexual abuse prevention. for grades K-6 and prevention of sexual violence for grades 7 to 12 In-service training of teachers and other professionals will also be required by the bill.

The bill would also inform parents of the curriculum and educational materials for dating violence prevention and sexual violence prevention classes, and require the Ohio Department of Education to provide links to sexual violence prevention programs on its website.

Zimov said his father was sentenced to life in prison, she told the Senate Committee on Primary and Secondary Education, where the bill is currently under consideration, and others have said that although they had seen justice for their attackers, a prison sentence was not enough. to deal with the trauma.

The Ohio Network of Children’s Advocacy Centers said while many believed COVID-19 school closures would reduce reports of abuse, the network has seen an increase from 9,000 in 2019 to 9,600 in 2020 .

“It was no coincidence that when schools resumed face-to-face classes, we saw an increase in referrals to our offices,” said Caitlin Bentley, statewide director of programming for ONCAC, during the committee hearing.

However, the number of sexual abuse cases may be higher because not all counties in Ohio have a child advocacy center to report abuse to.

“Given our ongoing crises of adding opioids (and) mental health, we owe ourselves how many unseen victims are out there,” Bentley said.

A report from the United States Bureau of Justice Statistics found that 1.6% of children between the ages of 12 and 17 had been raped or sexually assaulted, and a study from the Crimes Against Children Research Center showed 1 girl in 5 and 1 in 20 boys are victims of child sexual abuse.

Miranda LeBoeuf, of Washington County, is a survivor of years of sexual abuse by her father, but has also undergone years of treatment to learn the true impact of the abuse. Now that she has children of her own, she wants to watch her children go to school knowing what is wrong with adult and peer treatment.

“I firmly believe that if I had learned personal body safety as a young child, my life would have been completely different,” said LeBoeuf. “If I had had the words and the knowledge to really know what was happening to me, then maybe I could have prevented other victims as well.”

Rape survivor Jordan Potts pleaded with the committee to “feel the urgency that we survivors feel” but also to stay away from the language that places the burden on those sexually abused.

“I want to be clear, I wish I had been better prepared to deal with the violence I faced, but even more I wish the boys who raped my body had been educated about the harm they were facing. were doing, ”Potts said.

Jaclyn Scanlan, a mental health therapist now working in school-based therapy, said it was important to know that 93% of sexual abuse in America happens at the hands of someone other than the survivor. knows (according to the National Rape, Abuse & Incest Network), and sex offenders do not discriminate in finding their victims, so schools must be prepared to fight back.

“When you wonder if it is the school’s responsibility to do this, the answer is ‘yes’,” Scanlan told the committee. “Because our schools can be a refuge from these abuses. Our schools can reach more young people to spread this vital information.

RECEIVE MORNING TICKETS IN YOUR RECEPTION BOX


Source link

]]>
https://eartdocuments.com/sexual-abuse-survivors-speak-out-for-more-education/feed/ 0
Claimants’ Representatives in Indian Residential School Day Fellows Class Action Respond to Federal Court Approval of Settlement Agreement https://eartdocuments.com/claimants-representatives-in-indian-residential-school-day-fellows-class-action-respond-to-federal-court-approval-of-settlement-agreement/ https://eartdocuments.com/claimants-representatives-in-indian-residential-school-day-fellows-class-action-respond-to-federal-court-approval-of-settlement-agreement/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 13:19:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/claimants-representatives-in-indian-residential-school-day-fellows-class-action-respond-to-federal-court-approval-of-settlement-agreement/ VANCOUVER and TORONTO, Oct 05, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – NEWS PROVIDED BY Waddell Phillips Federal Court Judge McDonald approved a settlement agreement for residential school day school survivors and their children in the Gottfriedson v. Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada class action. Following a settlement approval hearing in early September, the court […]]]>

VANCOUVER and TORONTO, Oct 05, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – NEWS PROVIDED BY Waddell Phillips

Federal Court Judge McDonald approved a settlement agreement for residential school day school survivors and their children in the Gottfriedson v. Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada class action.

Following a settlement approval hearing in early September, the court determined that the settlement agreement is fair, reasonable and in the best interests of the survivors and descendants of the group. In rendering her decision, Justice McDonald took into account the submissions of counsel for the Survivors and Descendants group and for Canada, as well as the written and oral statements of the members of the group.

Under the terms of the settlement, each eligible Day Scholar will be able to seek individual compensation of $ 10,000 for harms (other than sexual abuse or serious physical abuse), including psychological harm and loss of language and culture. related to residential school attendance. The settlement also provides for a $ 50 million Day School Revitalization Fund to support the healing and linguistic and cultural recovery of day schools and their children.

Former shishalh chief Garry Feschuk, who initiated the action with his colleague from T’kemlups, former chief Shane Gottfriedson over 10 years ago, made the following statement:

“This settlement will ensure that compensation for survivors and their descendants occurs during their lifetime. Once we are ready to proceed with compensation, there will be a straightforward claims process. This was designed to minimize the burden on Day Scholars and their descendants. “

Selina August and Jeanette Jules representing the Shishalh and T’kemlups nations who initiated this process to seek redress for their Day Scholars and all Day Scholars provided the following statement:

“Our members who were day schools told us that they too suffered punishment for speaking our language and practicing our culture while they were in schools during the day. It was horrible and our day schools were once again left out, just as their suffering was ignored in the residential school regulations. We have now ensured that all Day Scholars who were alive as of May 30, 2005 are compensated for their “Common Experience Payment” and that no one is left behind. “

Applicants will only need to complete a simple form and will not need to provide information about their residential school experiences.

Survivors cannot claim compensation at this time. A settlement notice will be sent shortly to inform you of the process and the start date of the claim. The complaints process to seek compensation for day fellows will be open in early December subject to further direction from the Court.

Survivors and descendants are encouraged to check out the Justice for Day Scholars website and follow the Facebook information page for regular updates on the settlement and claims process. Details of the settlement agreement, as well as the supports that will be available once the claims process begins, will be available on the website.

Please visit www.justicefordayscholars.com and www.facebook.com/JusticeforDayScholars.

Day Fellows and descendants who have questions about the Settlement Agreement can contact Class Counsel (Waddell Phillips) toll-free.

Phone: 1-888-222-6845 (toll free)

Fax: 416 477-1657

Email: dayscholars@waddellphillips.ca

CONTACT: Titilayo Ajibose Argyle 437-788-2120 Tajibose@argylepr.com


Source link

]]>
https://eartdocuments.com/claimants-representatives-in-indian-residential-school-day-fellows-class-action-respond-to-federal-court-approval-of-settlement-agreement/feed/ 0
Nova Scotia’s Proof of Vaccine Policy: What You Need to Know https://eartdocuments.com/nova-scotias-proof-of-vaccine-policy-what-you-need-to-know/ https://eartdocuments.com/nova-scotias-proof-of-vaccine-policy-what-you-need-to-know/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 19:02:19 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/nova-scotias-proof-of-vaccine-policy-what-you-need-to-know/ Nova Scotia’s COVID-19 proof of vaccination system began Monday, requiring people to show proof that they are fully vaccinated before being allowed into non-essential locations across the province. People habit must show anything to enter what the province has deemed essential, including grocery stores, pharmacies, health services, banks, stores, any place where government services are […]]]>

Nova Scotia’s COVID-19 proof of vaccination system began Monday, requiring people to show proof that they are fully vaccinated before being allowed into non-essential locations across the province.

People habit must show anything to enter what the province has deemed essential, including grocery stores, pharmacies, health services, banks, stores, any place where government services are offered, religious services and much other places.

People will must show physical or digital proof that they have received two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine to enter restaurants, bars, sports venues, gyms, theaters, cinemas and casinos, among other places ” non-essential “. The second dose must have arrived 14 days before the date you are trying to enter the facility.

A full list of both categories is available online.

People will also need to show some ID to confirm that the vaccination record is theirs. It does not have to be photo ID. People can use their driver’s license, passport, medicare card, birth certificate, student card, or certificate of Indian status.

People can show the physical cards, photocopies, digital versions or clear photos or screenshots of the ID and proof of vaccination document.

Nova Scotians can use a photo or screenshot of their proof of vaccination or print it out. (Government of Nova Scotia)

The rules only apply to people 12 years of age and older. People who are not permanent residents of Nova Scotia may show proof of vaccination and identification from their province, territory or country of origin.

Proof of vaccination

Nova Scotians can download their proof of vaccination from this provincial government website or by calling 1-833-797-7772. You need your health insurance card to log on to the site. Once you’ve downloaded the certificate that says you’ve received two doses of the vaccine, you can either print a hard copy or store it on your phone.

You can show your ID in card, paper and digital formats, along with clear photos, screenshots and photocopies.

Where you don’t need it

People not need to show ID or proof of vaccination to enter most places that do not host formal gatherings and places that offer essential services, such as:

  • retail stores
  • financial institutions
  • professional services like accountants and lawyers
  • personal services such as hair salons, barber shops, spas, nail salons and body art establishments
  • health services and health professions such as doctor’s offices, dental care, massage therapy and physiotherapy
  • rental accommodation such as hotel rooms, cabins and campgrounds
  • religious services
  • Kindergarten to Grade 12 school activities and outings that take place during the school day (unless a school trip is for an event or activity where full proof of vaccination is required), before and after school programs and buses school
  • post-secondary institutions (universities, NSCC, private career colleges and language schools) unless they organize events or activities that are attended by the public
  • mental health and addiction support groups
  • business meetings and other workplace activities involving people who regularly work together and where the public is not present (except in a rented space)
  • legally required meetings where public participation cannot be done virtually (such as city council meetings where citizens have a democratic right to participate)
  • safety training that is required for a person’s job and cannot be done virtually
  • places where government services are available (such as Access Nova Scotia)
  • food banks, shelters, family resource centers and adult day programs for seniors and people with disabilities
  • programs and services for vulnerable populations that cannot be offered virtually (unless meals are provided; meals can only be provided by take-out or delivered to people who cannot show full proof of vaccination)
  • informal meetings in a private residence
  • general access to public libraries (such as borrowing books and using computers)
  • public transport

Where you need it

People to do need to show ID and proof of vaccination at non-essential events and locations that bring groups together, such as:

  • full-service restaurants where guests sit at tables to be served, both indoors and on patios
  • dining establishments (such as fast food outlets and cafes) where people sit down to eat and drink, both indoors and on terraces (excluding take-out, drive-thru or delivery)
  • licensed alcoholic beverage establishments (such as bars, wineries, distillery tasting rooms, craft tap rooms, and liquor makers), both indoors and on patios
  • casinos and gaming establishments, indoors and on patios
  • fitness facilities (such as gymnasiums and yoga studios) and sports and recreational facilities (such as arenas, swimming pools, and large multi-purpose recreation facilities)
  • businesses and organizations offering indoor and outdoor recreation and leisure activities (such as climbing facilities, dance lessons, escape rooms, go-karts, indoor arcades, indoor play areas, music lessons, pottery painting, shooting ranges and outdoor adventures)
  • indoor and outdoor festivals, special events and artistic and cultural events (such as theatrical performances, concerts and cinemas), unless they are outdoor events held in a public space without a specific entry point ( as Nocturne)
  • indoor and outdoor sports practices, games, competitions and tournaments (participants and spectators)
  • indoor and outdoor extra-curricular activities, including sports
  • excursions by bus, boat and on foot
  • museums, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia and public library programs
  • indoor and outdoor events and activities such as receptions, social events, conferences and trainings organized by a company or organization
  • indoor and outdoor wedding and funeral ceremonies (including receptions and visits) organized by a business or organization
  • community meetings in rental spaces or where the public can be present (such as annual general meetings of companies or organizations)
  • training hosted by a company or organization (such as driver training or courses offered by a company that offers training) and any training using rental space

Dr Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer of health, said businesses and people who break the rules could face substantial fines.

He said workplaces can develop their own proof of vaccination policies. People should always wear masks indoors in public places, including essential places.

“It’s the unvaccinated people who put enormous strain on our health care system and because of this in other parts of the country there are a lot of people with non-COVID health care who cannot getting the care they need and their lives are at risk, ”Strang told CBC News.

“It is about doing what is necessary to ensure our mutual security and to protect our health care system.”

The province did not say how long the new policy will last.

MORE STORIES


Source link

]]>
https://eartdocuments.com/nova-scotias-proof-of-vaccine-policy-what-you-need-to-know/feed/ 0
After failing to communicate with Spanish-speaking families, CCDS strives to build supports | SC education laboratory https://eartdocuments.com/after-failing-to-communicate-with-spanish-speaking-families-ccds-strives-to-build-supports-sc-education-laboratory/ https://eartdocuments.com/after-failing-to-communicate-with-spanish-speaking-families-ccds-strives-to-build-supports-sc-education-laboratory/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 20:00:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/after-failing-to-communicate-with-spanish-speaking-families-ccds-strives-to-build-supports-sc-education-laboratory/ NORTH CHARLESTON – Monica Leon hesitated before calling Hunley Park Elementary School. Whenever the Spanish-speaking mom of three needed to pick up her students early or wanted to know about changes in the school, she approached the phone with concern. “What am I going to say?” She thought, bracing herself for the moment the English-speaking […]]]>

NORTH CHARLESTON – Monica Leon hesitated before calling Hunley Park Elementary School.

Whenever the Spanish-speaking mom of three needed to pick up her students early or wanted to know about changes in the school, she approached the phone with concern.

“What am I going to say?” She thought, bracing herself for the moment the English-speaking secretary would pick up.

She often found herself digging through emails the Charleston County School District sent to parents, trying to decipher school news using Google Translate, which was often unreliable. . Her problems escalated once the pandemic hit and her children were learning at home. Written communication became the primary means by which Leon found out what was going on in Hunley Park.

Leon’s situation is not unique. The number of Hispanics in South Carolina has increased dramatically over the past two decades. According to census data, 95,076 people in the state identified as Hispanic in 2000. In 2019, that number was 298,478.

This influx has been reflected in schools in South Carolina, with the number of Hispanic and Latino students increasing from 51,894 to 87,639 in the past eight years.

Some of these students and their parents have difficulty with English, which means they often have to navigate the complicated school system without access to resources. Often, districts do not have the tools in place to keep them properly informed about what is happening in their children’s schools.

Until this year, the Charleston County School District was unable to communicate properly with its Spanish-speaking parents. Results released in March of a federal survey found that the district often did not use qualified interpreters in meetings with Spanish-speaking or little English-speaking families and did not consistently translate written communications into Spanish.

The school agreed to improve its services for non-English speaking parents as part of its settlement agreement and created a new Office of Interpretation and Translation Services.

Since its inception, the office has helped the district strengthen its services for Spanish-speaking families by easing the burden of translation and interpretation on district workers who help families with issues that sometimes go beyond school matters. typical.






Hispanic Hunley_3.jpg

Girmania Matrillé, parent advocate at Hunley Park Elementary School, sets up decorations in the school hallway for Hispanic Heritage Month on Tuesday, September 14, 2021 in North Charleston. Andrew J. Whitaker / Staff




Christina Vivas, a bilingual parent activist in the district’s learning services department, told The Post and Courier that in addition to her work helping children from non-English speaking families in classrooms, checking out their immunization forms and other day-to-day duties, she helps families find affordable housing, find low-cost or free furniture, lead teenage pregnancy groups and connect with caregivers primary. It was much more difficult for Vivas to offer these services before the creation of the new office.

“These are the things we can do now that the translation bureau is with us and we can focus more on providing these resources,” Vivas said.

Angela Rush, the director of the office, said their work is especially important as the delta variant of the coronavirus is causing schools to be closed and students being quarantined. Last year, South Carolina saw the pandemic hit Spanish-speaking students particularly hard, as many of those students struggled to learn online and virtually. Often, they did not have access to the Internet and had difficulty communicating with their teachers.

COVID made SC students suffer last year.  Now educators are wondering how to fix it.

Their school results suffered as a result. From 2020 to 2021, the number of students learning English who met or exceeded learning goals fell by 20 percentage points. Just 24.3% of students met or exceeded South Carolina’s 2020-2021 report card goals, falling below the state’s average of 31.7%.

The Charleston County Parent Advocate Office assists students like these by visiting their homes to make sure they can log into their school’s online learning portals and help families show negative outcomes testing their children at the district.

The office currently employs three interpreters who work with school administration, parent advocates and other school officials to translate newsletters, emails, documents and anything else parents need to know. ‘to access. The district is looking to expand the services of the translation bureau, investing more than $ 700,000 to hire 13 additional bilingual secretaries.

Nine of those positions are currently open to anyone who is bilingual with a high school diploma and one year of office experience, although Rush cautioned that they are looking for employees who understand all the complex issues that non-English speaking families are faced with. faced.






Hispanic Hunley_2.jpg

Left to right, Mari Bartolón, Monica Leon, Girmania Matrillé and Neila Agosto sit in the parent meeting room with Matrillé, a parent advocate at Hunley Park Elementary School on Tuesday, September 14, 2021 in North Charleston. Andrew J. Whitaker / Staff




The office has improved the lives of Spanish speakersg parents in Charleston like Monica Leon and Mari Bartolón. Bartolón used to wait days in his old neighborhood to talk to teachers and principals about his three children. The district employed a bilingual person, who only came on Fridays.

Bartolón would be getting ready for this Friday, walking around the neighborhood with a list of questions she hoped to get answered. The whole experience left her alone and frustrated. This ultimately prompted her to enroll her students at Hunley Park.

CCSD forces teachers to open virtual classrooms, improves security under mask warrant

Since then, Girmania Matrillé, the neighborhood parents’ lawyer, has been his lifeline. She has guided Bartolón through all of the school’s processes and changes in a way that she understands. Bartolón regularly meets Matrillé in the parents’ room in Hunley Park, a former classroom now equipped with a sofa, coffee table, books, and toys.

“The truth is, they’re stressed out. They are stressed all the time. … We try to calm them down and create that atmosphere and space where they can feel safe, they can feel engaged and they can feel loved, ”said Matrillé.

Follow Libby Stanford on Twitter @libbystanford.


Source link

]]>
https://eartdocuments.com/after-failing-to-communicate-with-spanish-speaking-families-ccds-strives-to-build-supports-sc-education-laboratory/feed/ 0
Help amid grief as Afghan refugees begin new life in Melbourne https://eartdocuments.com/help-amid-grief-as-afghan-refugees-begin-new-life-in-melbourne/ https://eartdocuments.com/help-amid-grief-as-afghan-refugees-begin-new-life-in-melbourne/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 02:50:31 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/help-amid-grief-as-afghan-refugees-begin-new-life-in-melbourne/ Some evacuees lost family members in the rush to board a plane from Afghanistan, arriving in Australia completely alone. Loading Others, who could not be identified for security reasons, said Age how they were threatened and beaten at gunpoint by the Taliban as they entered the airport. Several Afghans have died after trying to cling […]]]>

Some evacuees lost family members in the rush to board a plane from Afghanistan, arriving in Australia completely alone.

Loading

Others, who could not be identified for security reasons, said Age how they were threatened and beaten at gunpoint by the Taliban as they entered the airport.

Several Afghans have died after trying to cling to a US military plane as it took off from Kabul airport, in heartbreaking scenes projected across the world.

“Entire families have been separated by this,” said Ms. Tauoqooqo, who has worked with the refugees for seven years.

“This is something I have never seen before and it speaks volumes about the urgency of the situation. There was a significant separation from the immediate family; parents and children, husbands and wives separated, which is completely devastating.

Ms Tauoqooqo is helping run a health program for hundreds of Afghan refugees in Melbourne, helping them pair them with medical assessments, trauma counseling, COVID vaccinations and tests while they wait for permanent accommodation.

The program vaccinates over 700 Afghan refugees in Victoria.

“I always tell people, if you drop me off in Kabul tomorrow and say you understand the system, enroll your kids in schools, find a house and get a health card. Where do you start? ” she said.

Knowing how to book a coronavirus vaccine in a foreign country isn’t the top priority when you’ve just fled your home, but Ms Tauoqooqo points out that refugees have arrived in Victoria amid the lockdown, as the virus infects more than 1000 people every day.

“We have to make sure they have the same protections against the virus as everyone else,” she said.

Many of the Afghan women arriving in Australia are pregnant, increasing the urgency to vaccinate them due to the risk of a weakened immune system during pregnancy, which means they are at increased risk of respiratory disease.

The federal government and AMES Australia – which provides settlement assistance for migrants – oversee their resettlement.

“Many asylum seekers spent long periods in refugee camps and were briefed by Home Affairs while they were abroad, and they had time to reflect on what the future, ”said Laurie Nowell, spokesperson for AMES.

“But these people have been catapulted into a new country where there is a level of uncertainty that is made worse by COVID lockdowns.”

Mr Nowell said many refugees needed complex trauma counseling and temporary accommodation in the first place.

Afghan refugees in a temporary camp at the US Army Rhine Ammunition Barracks in Germany.Credit:Getty

AMES was also helping to enroll children in online English schools, to support them before they start school in Australia next year.

But he said in the midst of grief, were moments of elation.

Last month, an Afghan father who had lived in Australia and separated from his child for a decade was reunited with them on the ground floor of a Melbourne hotel.

“It was a beautiful moment,” Mr. Nowell said.

Get a rating directly from our stranger Correspondents on what makes the headlines in the world. Sign up for the weekly What in the World newsletter here.


Source link

]]>
https://eartdocuments.com/help-amid-grief-as-afghan-refugees-begin-new-life-in-melbourne/feed/ 0
Language of mask orders in Michigan budget confuses health department mandates https://eartdocuments.com/language-of-mask-orders-in-michigan-budget-confuses-health-department-mandates/ https://eartdocuments.com/language-of-mask-orders-in-michigan-budget-confuses-health-department-mandates/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 11:01:34 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/language-of-mask-orders-in-michigan-budget-confuses-health-department-mandates/ LANSING, MI – The governor’s office urges county health officials to retain K-12 mask warrants amid confusion over state budget provisions 2021-22 that seek to ban health services to issue COVID-19 rules. The budget bill passed earlier this month by the Michigan legislature contains language inserted by Republicans that seeks to restrict the powers of […]]]>

LANSING, MI – The governor’s office urges county health officials to retain K-12 mask warrants amid confusion over state budget provisions 2021-22 that seek to ban health services to issue COVID-19 rules.

The budget bill passed earlier this month by the Michigan legislature contains language inserted by Republicans that seeks to restrict the powers of local public health departments trying to control the community spread of COVID-19.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s office reiterated its position on Friday, saying health services should ignore the budget guidelines as “unconstitutional.”

Despite state assurances, several county health departments have already used the budget, which was seen as a victory for Republican lawmakers in negotiations, to justify decisions to reverse mask orders.

Health departments covering Allegan, Berrien, Dickinson, Iron, Barry, Eaton, Branch, Hillsdale and St. Joseph counties have all cited the state budget for overturning health mandates.

“Local health departments should keep their mask policies in place,” said Robert Leddy, spokesperson for Whitmer.

“As the governor has made clear, budget provisions that attempt to prohibit these policies clearly violate the state constitution,” Leddy said. “The state of Michigan will continue to provide funding to local health departments that implement universal mask policies or school quarantine protocols to keep students safe so they can learn in person. “

Whitmer enacted the budget on Wednesday, but vetoed a handful of articles and declared “unworkable” language that threatens funding for health services that issue COVID-19-related warrants.

Related: Whitmer enacts Michigan budget, praises bipartisan nature of negotiations

The first payments of state funding under the new budget will be made by next week, regardless of a county’s health status, the governor’s office said.

Still, some local health departments have released statements suggesting they could lose state funding if they don’t remove their COVID-19-related mandates.

A statement from Branch-Hillsdale-St. The Joseph Community Health Agency said Thursday it was forced to reverse recent public health orders or could lose $ 1 million in state funding.

The Tri-County Health Agency on Thursday declared its Sept. 22 health ordinance requiring employers, educational institutions and people in Branch, Hillsdale and St. Joseph counties to self-quarantine after close contact exposure with a person infected with COVID-19 is no longer midnight on October 1.

Related: West Michigan Health Department cancels order for K-6 masks, citing fears of losing $ 1 million in funding

A press release from the agency said the decision was made after Whitmer signed the 2022 state budget.

Although Whitmer called the budget language unconstitutional, the agency’s legal advisor said the governor’s position had not been tested in court.

“The branch-Hillsdale-St. Joseph Community Health Agency cannot risk losing this vital local public funding that supports vital community programs and services, including vaccinations, infectious disease control, sexually transmitted disease control and prevention, hearing screening, vision services, food protection, public water supply, private groundwater supply and on-site wastewater management, ”said an agency statement.

While acknowledging that the mask requirement is “an effective and evidence-based mitigation strategy to reduce the risk of transmission for vulnerable populations in school settings,” the Allegan County Health Department released on Thursday. a statement saying that language in the state budget “jeopardizes the future funding of the health department.” whether a mask order remains in effect.

The Michigan Association for Local Public Health released a statement Thursday urging health departments to continue doing what is best for the health of their communities.

“(Health departments) did not issue any school mask orders or quarantine orders as a political gesture,” said Norm Hess, executive director of the public health association.

“The Delta variant affects children. This wave of illness has been steadily increasing in the state for over a month, and our deep concern is that when the hot weather soon ends and everyone comes back indoors, it will skyrocket. We hope we are wrong. But if we are not, it is a travesty to play politics with public health, and we will all suffer the consequences together. “

Hess said local health officials are “stunned” that Michigan officials will “willfully escalate” the conflict between health departments and county councils by leaving language in the budget upon approval.

Some county commissions and local health agencies don’t believe Whitmer’s declaring the language unconstitutional offers sufficient protection against legal challenges, Hess said.

“Some of them will be canceling their prescriptions today, not because they want to, but because they cannot in good conscience risk losing the funding they need to maintain vital public health programs. over the coming year, ”she said.

The Michigan Parent Alliance for Safe Schools and the Michigan Association of Local Public Health have both called on the MDHHS to enact a statewide school mask mandate to protect children and “reduce chaos” around children. local health orders.

Emily Mellits, a parent in Macomb County and a member of the alliance, said counties have a moral obligation to adopt crazy masks when COVID-19 is on the rise and healthcare workers are overwhelmed with patients.

“Lives are literally at stake,” Mellits said. “Schools without a mask requirement are among the main drivers of new COVID-19 cases in the state. “

Mellits referred to the threats and harassment health workers have endured throughout the pandemic, saying she feared “science-denying” individuals putting up roadblocks to protect children attending school. in person.

Related: ‘I need help’: Kent County’s top health official tells commissioners after threats and road rage in COVID-19 response

Some health departments, such as in Kalamazoo or Washtenaw counties, cite the Michigan Health Code in their decisions to keep orders for school masks in place.

The Michigan Public Health Code authorizes local health departments to issue prescriptions in response to outbreaks.

As of October 1, 222 districts representing 748,181 students had implemented a mask policy. 59.72% of students in traditional public schools are protected by a mask policy, according to state data.

LEARN MORE ABOUT MLIVE:

Kalamazoo County School Mask Order remains in effect with council backing, health ministry says

Michigan Electoral College votes would go to the winner of the national popular vote if the ballot initiative is successful


Source link

]]>
https://eartdocuments.com/language-of-mask-orders-in-michigan-budget-confuses-health-department-mandates/feed/ 0
The Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM) appoints Jennifer Rasamimanana as Resident Director https://eartdocuments.com/the-tangier-american-legation-institute-for-moroccan-studies-talim-appoints-jennifer-rasamimanana-as-resident-director/ https://eartdocuments.com/the-tangier-american-legation-institute-for-moroccan-studies-talim-appoints-jennifer-rasamimanana-as-resident-director/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 19:25:09 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/the-tangier-american-legation-institute-for-moroccan-studies-talim-appoints-jennifer-rasamimanana-as-resident-director/ The Board of Directors of the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM) announces the appointment of Jennifer Rasamimanana as Resident Director. “With her language skills, diplomatic and cultural background and vision, Jennifer Rasamimanana is ideal to lead the American Legation in Tangier at this historic moment,” said Chairman of the Board, Dale F. […]]]>

The Board of Directors of the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM) announces the appointment of Jennifer Rasamimanana as Resident Director.

“With her language skills, diplomatic and cultural background and vision, Jennifer Rasamimanana is ideal to lead the American Legation in Tangier at this historic moment,” said Chairman of the Board, Dale F. Eickelman.

A United States diplomat for over 20 years, Jennifer Rasamimanana served as the United States Consul General in Casablanca from 2017 to 2020. Education outreach for the United States Embassy in Egypt.

Previously, Ms. Rasamimanana was Cultural Attaché in Paris as well as Diplomat in Residence and Visiting Professor at SciencesPo School of International Affairs, Paris.

During the Arab Spring, she served as the State Department’s regional spokesperson for the Arabic language and led engagement with the Arabic-speaking public of Oman in Morocco. She has also served in the United States embassies in Jordan, Tunisia, Syria and Togo, as well as in key positions in the State Department in Washington DC.

Prior to joining the Foreign Service, Ms. Rasamimanana taught English as a Foreign Language in Madagascar and worked in technology investment banking and venture capital in Silicon Valley. A graduate of Guillaume et Marie College, she speaks French and Arabic.

“The American Legation is a vital and tangible symbol of more than 200 years of friendship between Morocco and the United States,” said US Embassy charge d’affaires David Greene.

“As a former Consul General in Casablanca, Jennifer maintains close ties with Morocco and is well placed to help us continue to build on the historic friendship between our two countries. It will also help us continue to celebrate the bicentenary of the Legation, our oldest diplomatic post in the world.

The American Legation in Tangier, donated to the United States in 1821 by Sultan Moulay Slimane, is the only national historic monument outside American territory. a language school and a Peace Corps training site. Today it is a museum, research library and cultural center. He also represents the American Institute for Maghrib Studies (GOALS), which is part of the Council of American Overseas Research Centers.

“I am delighted to return to Morocco, which feels like coming home, and to continue to contribute to the deep and historic friendship between the United States and Morocco,” said Ms. Rasamimanana. “As the Legation celebrates its bicentennial, I look forward to helping this unique and wonderful institution grow, innovate and reach new audiences in its third century. “

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of the United States Embassy in Morocco.

Media files

Download logo

The Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM) Appoint Jennifer Rasamimanana Resident Director
U.S. Embassy in Morocco

Africanews provides APO Group content as a service to its readers, but does not edit the articles it publishes.


Source link

]]>
https://eartdocuments.com/the-tangier-american-legation-institute-for-moroccan-studies-talim-appoints-jennifer-rasamimanana-as-resident-director/feed/ 0