Language school – Eart Documents http://eartdocuments.com/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 02:15:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://eartdocuments.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-07-01T001347.882.png Language school – Eart Documents http://eartdocuments.com/ 32 32 New science program implemented in Joplin school district | KSNF / KODE https://eartdocuments.com/new-science-program-implemented-in-joplin-school-district-ksnf-kode/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 01:34:42 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/new-science-program-implemented-in-joplin-school-district-ksnf-kode/ JOPLIN, Mo. – You may remember “See Spot Run” as a crucial step in learning to read.But the Joplin School District is taking a new approach, focusing on science and how young brains make the connection to literacy. It’s called “LETRS”, which stands for Language Essentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling. “Kids, how they […]]]>

JOPLIN, Mo. – You may remember “See Spot Run” as a crucial step in learning to read.
But the Joplin School District is taking a new approach, focusing on science and how young brains make the connection to literacy.

It’s called “LETRS”, which stands for Language Essentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling.

“Kids, how they learn, how their brains work,” said Melissa Kendall, McKinley Elementary.

Then use it to help them read the connection. This is the objective of the LETRS program.

“They have it, it’s not memorization. It’s not – oh, it has to be like that – it’s the real property of their abilities, ”Kendall said.

The scientific approach means that teachers start with the sounds of words and how they go together. Students listen to syllables and compound words.

“They’ll light up when they have a concept – you can just see it. “

The Joplin School District trains leaders in every elementary school. Once this is in place, these facilitators will pass on what they know to others on campus.

“Teachers are the most essential factor inside our classrooms. This is why our teachers who provide direct and explicit instruction to our students in the world of reading are critically important to our academic progress, ”said Sarah Mwangi, Deputy Superintendent of Joplin Schools.

The end goal is to improve student reading… and what comes next.

“This applies to all other subjects, the ability to read and write effectively is of critical importance to our students and their future. And so, the more knowledge we can acquire, and we can implement the way we fully anticipate that our scores will continue to increase and our students will be very successful, ”Mwangi added.

THE “LETRS” program is mainly aimed at children from kindergarten to grade 3. This can also apply to struggling readers in Grades 4 and 5, and potentially even students with special needs in high school.


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“It’s a revenge”: the worldwide success of Tahitian dance that the Europeans tried to ban | Tahiti https://eartdocuments.com/its-a-revenge-the-worldwide-success-of-tahitian-dance-that-the-europeans-tried-to-ban-tahiti/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 05:02:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/its-a-revenge-the-worldwide-success-of-tahitian-dance-that-the-europeans-tried-to-ban-tahiti/ WWearing intricate costumes made of plants and adorned with tropical flowers, the women look spectacular. While their torsos remain completely still, somehow impossible, their hips are circling so fast it’s almost a blur. These women perform the traditional Tahitian dance, or Ori Tahiti, during Tahiti’s annual cultural festival, the Heiva. And they are not alone. […]]]>

WWearing intricate costumes made of plants and adorned with tropical flowers, the women look spectacular. While their torsos remain completely still, somehow impossible, their hips are circling so fast it’s almost a blur.

These women perform the traditional Tahitian dance, or Ori Tahiti, during Tahiti’s annual cultural festival, the Heiva. And they are not alone. Thousands of women around the world, from Mexico to Japan, do it too.

According to a report released by the French Ministry of Culture in 2017, there were over 12,000 Ori Tahiti dancers in the United States and over 10,000 in Latin America. In Japan, the movement has attracted 25,000 dancers and is expected to reach 500,000 by 2027.

Ori Tahiti is a broad term that encompasses the many traditional dances originating from the island of Tahiti, performed by both men and women. The best known is the ote’aa very fast dance that shakes the hips, performed by women. Another is the aparimawhich exhibits slower and more graceful body movements. Both dances are difficult to master, but absolutely captivating to watch.

Moena Maiotui, one of Tahiti’s most popular professional dancers.

“The dance itself, in my eyes, is the most beautiful, the most powerful, the most sensual and the most expressive,” says Tumata Robinson, renowned Tahitian choreographer, costume designer and founder of the famous dance group. Tahiti Ora.

“I think Ori Tahiti is very complete, you know. It’s fierce, but also elegant and powerful, graceful, feminine when we dance. I feel pretty [when I dance]Says Moena Maiotui, one of Tahiti’s most beloved professional dancers, who has traveled the world to perform, teach Ori workshops and share Tahitian culture. YouTube videos of her dancing, solo and with the Tahiti Ora dance group, have racked up millions of views.

“It’s always good to be on stage and share the culture and what we love and the passion and also tell the story… with our hands and share that moment with the people watching.”

Self-expression and connection to nature is what Ori Tahiti is for Rina Hanzawa. Born and raised in Tokyo, Hanzawa discovered Ori Tahiti in her early twenties.

“I went to dance school and found Ori Tahiti there,” says Hanzawa. “At the time, I had no idea of ​​Tahitian culture. But I fell in love with Ori Tahiti when I tried it. The Ori movement was so natural to me – it was just very comfortable to do so I felt a strong connection with it.

What started as a casual hobby quickly grew into an enduring passion, which led her to compete at the national level.

Hanzawa now lives in Australia, where she has established her own Tahitian dance school, Tai Pererau, on the beaches of northern Sydney.

“My fire of love towards Tahitian culture will never be extinguished,” she said.

The dance that started this fire, however, was almost extinct. The arrival of Europeans in French Polynesia, along with their religion and their laws, saw Ori Tahiti banished or suppressed for nearly 100 years.

Hinatea Colombani, Tahitian cultural expert and director of the Arioi cultural and artistic center.
Hinatea Colombani, Tahitian cultural expert and director of the Arioi cultural and artistic center.

At the end of the 18th century, the dance was banned by European missionaries, who called it immoral. Then, in 1819, the Pomare Code, a set of laws enacted by the Tahitian monarchy, outright banned traditional dances. In 1842, the French protectorate authorized dancing – but with so many conditions that the practice was still repressed.

It wasn’t until the 1960s that the church began to lose its influence and traditional dances really started to revive. During this time, the first modern dance group made its appearance, led by Madeleine Mou’a.

Damaris Cairo, author of a book titled Ori Tahiti: Between Tradition, Culture and Modernity, says: “Little by little, by doing dance shows in hotels for tourists, Ori Tahiti became popular – even if the local population initially had a hard time accepting it. “

In the 1970s, Tahitian cultural revival was in full swing and from the 1980s, Ori Tahiti was rediscovered, reinvented and fully adopted by the local population.

Despite a turbulent past, Ori Tahiti has today become a way for Tahitians to connect with their ancestors, their land and their language. It is a celebration of a cultural identity and pride that was almost lost due to colonization. Today, it has become one of Tahiti’s best exports.

Hinatea Colombani, expert on Tahitian culture and director of the Arioi Cultural and Arts Center, says it’s particularly satisfying to see Ori Tahiti become popular in the very countries that tried to eradicate the practice two centuries ago.

“For me it’s revenge, because they celebrate our culture,” she says.

“Ori Tahiti is a freedom for me. Freedom of movement, freedom for the soul… and a very important way to escape from everyday life and connect with my ancestors and tradition.

This year, the 2021 international Heiva Ori Tahiti Nui – Ori Tahiti’s biggest competition – had to be held online due to the pandemic. However, it still managed to attract competitors from 12 countries and territories, including two new entrants: New Caledonia and Switzerland.

The Te Ori Tahiti school in Geneva, which has more than 70 dancers, aged between eight and 68 years old.
The Te Ori Tahiti school in Geneva, which has more than 70 dancers, aged between eight and 68 years old.

Ginie Naea, from France, is a dance teacher at the Te Ori Tahiti school in Geneva. The school has over 70 dancers, ranging in age from eight to 68 years old. After competing for the first time online in the international competition, they won fourth place in a group category and first place for solo. ote’a – which was danced by Naea.

“It was a really great experience,” Naea said of the competition. “We danced in front of Lake Geneva and the mountains; it was just magic. The best part of the competition was actually the preparation and team cohesion it required – a connection that is created during performance. There is a real bond between the Ori Tahiti dancers, a real family that is created around the same passion.

“Ori Tahiti is more than a discipline, it is an art of living. It’s something that really completes me… an art in which I thrive – as a woman, as a friend, as a mother – it’s really part of my daily life.


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UB’s Confucius Institute celebrates 12 years of impactful programming https://eartdocuments.com/ubs-confucius-institute-celebrates-12-years-of-impactful-programming/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 12:42:03 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/ubs-confucius-institute-celebrates-12-years-of-impactful-programming/ As the UB Confucius Institute (UBCI) ceased its operations at the end of 2021, faculty, administrators and community partners celebrated its impactful work at the university and in western state of New York for the past 12 years with a celebration that included a music and dance program at UB and a banquet at the […]]]>

As the UB Confucius Institute (UBCI) ceased its operations at the end of 2021, faculty, administrators and community partners celebrated its impactful work at the university and in western state of New York for the past 12 years with a celebration that included a music and dance program at UB and a banquet at the Eastern Pearl Restaurant in Amherst.

Established in November 2009, UBCI has sponsored research, teaching and artistic production related to China at UB; Chinese language teaching and student exchange at UB and local K-12 schools; and cultural events that fostered a better understanding throughout western New York State of Chinese traditions and contemporary culture. Annual funding was provided by the Office of the International Chinese Language Council (aka “Hanban”) and UB in cooperation with Capital Normal University, UB’s long-time partner in Beijing.

For the December 12 afternoon program at the Center for the Arts Dramatic Theater, John Wood, Senior Associate Vice-President for International Education, delivered a welcoming address on behalf of Nojin Kwak, Vice-President for international education, who was traveling abroad.

“We can never know how much the encounter with China made possible by UBCI will influence the thousands of local K-12 students who have benefited from its programs, let alone our own students at the UB, ”Wood said. “It is therefore very unfortunate that the current circumstances leave UB no choice but to close the institute. For those of us who have been involved in our long-standing collaborations with China, this new era of growing geopolitical tensions is painful to contemplate, as we are losing a key local resource for engagement with China.

The program that followed Wood’s remarks included vocal performances by the Buffalo Chinese Chorus, Nichols School Chinese Chorus, and soloist Robert Liu; instrumental pieces performed in guzheng by Zhongbei (Daisy) Wu, visiting associate professor of music and director of the Confucius Institute at Alfred University, and in viola by Leanne Darling, assistant professor of viola interpretation at the ‘UB; and dances presented by the Buffalo Fanghua Dance Group, the Buffalo Taichi Group, the Buffalo Qipao Group and UB management student Yijun Zhu.

A highlight of the evening’s banquet at Eastern Pearl was the presentation of the Confucius Educator Award to local K-12 Chinese language teachers, Yajie Zhang of Nichols School and Shue Zheng of City Honors. School, and Xuehong Lü, director of the Chinese language program at UB for nearly 20 years before his retirement in 2018. The awards recognized the distinguished teaching and outstanding leadership of the recipients in the development of premier Chinese language programs. plan in their respective institutions.

The banquet program also included remarks from UB administrators and Confucius Institute community partners. Lixin Zhang, president of the Chinese Club of Western New York when UBCI was established, spoke about the central role UBCI has played in hosting the annual Chinese New Year of the community gala at the Center for the Arts and in many other collaborative programs. Paul Casseri, Lewiston Porter Central School District superintendent, thanked UBCI for helping place 10 J-1 visiting professors from China in the district, for funding Confucius classes, and for collaborating on many other programs that have introduced Lewiston Porter students and teachers to the Chinese language. and cultural.

Other speakers on the evening program include Stephen Dunnett, professor emeritus of education, former vice-president of international education and long-time chair of the UBCI advisory board; Zhiqiang Liu, director of UBCI and professor of economics; and UBCI Associate Director Bruce Acker.

Dunnett reflected on the impact of UBCI over the years, noting how proud he was of his association with the institute and of his many contributions to improving knowledge of Chinese language and culture. , and support for university research on China. He said he viewed UBCI as an outgrowth of UB’s pioneering programs in China in the early 1980s, which made the university particularly well-known there.

In a previous ceremony honoring members of the Confucius Institute Advisory Board, John Thomas, Professor and Dean Emeritus of the School of Management, received the Confucius Educator Award for his leadership in several groundbreaking Executive MBA programs in China and elsewhere in Asia.

From 2010 to 21, the Confucius Institute partnered with professors from many departments at UB to co-sponsor 74 lectures given by professors and other leading scholars in Chinese studies across North America; 26 major conferences, symposia and art exhibitions featuring scholars and artists based in the United States and China; and over 25 workshops and seminars for teachers. The institute hosted six Chinese J-1 visiting professors to teach in the linguistics, learning and teaching and art departments of UB, and organized 42 Chinese J-1 teachers to teach the language and Chinese culture in K-12 schools in Erie. and the counties of Niagara.

Through the Confucius Institute, more than 80 UB students and 75 high school students received full or partial funding to study in China, including 12 students who received Confucius Institute scholarships for one semester or one year of study. ‘studies in Chinese universities. In total, more than 35,000 students from UB and Western New York have studied in Chinese language programs affiliated with UB Confucius Institute.

Liu concluded the December 12 program by thanking and congratulating UBCI sponsor and partner, Beijing Capital Normal University, as well as collaborators from the local community, as well as UB faculty and staff.

“As we celebrate 12 years of the Confucius Institute, let us be proud of what we have accomplished, together, over the past 12 years; be grateful to our sponsor and partners; and let’s congratulate each other, ”he said. “Together we had a fabulous race.

“As we bid farewell to the Confucius Institute,” he noted, “let us be confident that we will find new ways to continue the work of the Confucius Institute: promoting learning Chinese, fostering better understanding of Chinese society and engage in research and teaching of China.


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Geoff Johnson: Reconciliation begins with learning https://eartdocuments.com/geoff-johnson-reconciliation-begins-with-learning/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 13:06:14 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/geoff-johnson-reconciliation-begins-with-learning/ Canada’s history includes a long list of mistakes that will not be erased by adorning new or existing schools with Indigenous symbols. While the primary goal of the Truth and Reconciliation movement is to bring healing and encourage reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians, it will not be achieved through impressive-sounding call-to-action speeches. It will […]]]>

Canada’s history includes a long list of mistakes that will not be erased by adorning new or existing schools with Indigenous symbols.

While the primary goal of the Truth and Reconciliation movement is to bring healing and encourage reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians, it will not be achieved through impressive-sounding call-to-action speeches.

It will be about learning.

Nor will truth and reconciliation be accomplished by lofty political promises or public recognition that this is happening in unceded land (which covers most of British Columbia), or by demolishing statues of those who are now in disgrace or by redeveloping museums and renaming streets. to “decolonize” the mistakes and wrongs committed in another era.

It may be a start, but it is not enough.

The point is, the Constitution couldn’t be clearer that Indigenous land rights exist, according to Benjamin Ralston, lecturer and researcher at the Indigenous Law Center at the University of Saskatchewan.

But the flaw, says Ralston, lies in the endless struggles over exactly what these rights are, which can take decades to resolve in non-Indigenous courtrooms or in government-sponsored treaty negotiations – which only serve to reveal “cognitive dissonance” in the system when it comes to achieving meaningful truth and reconciliation.

“The real problem is, what are we doing now while these slow processes are taking place? Ralston asks.

It’s easy – we start by learning. We begin this learning in our schools by teaching why, in light of what we know now, “dreams of the future are better than history of the past”.

And yes, that’s a quote from Jefferson, an individual seriously flawed by today’s standards, but whose vision and words still resonate in a country struggling to live with its past.

The history of Canada, which our children must learn, is also a long list of mistakes that will not be erased by adorning new or existing schools with Indigenous symbols.

Instead, schools should be structured in such a way that it accepts that some of the cultural expectations and assumptions that underlie both the organization and the public education programs are in conflict with many cultural values, beliefs and practices. enduring aspects of indigenous tribal life.

If truth and reconciliation are to become more than a slogan, the cultural beliefs and obligations that define Indigenous family life must be taken into account through the configuration of our schools in 2021.

At present, and I don’t think this is overstated, attempts to forcibly integrate Indigenous children into what is still essentially a colonial model of public education are only a few generations away from the assumptions that have been made. led to the development of Indian residential schools. first established in the 1880s – whose stated purpose was to assimilate Indigenous children into Euro-Canadian society.

What is needed, if truth and reconciliation are to be part of every child’s understanding, is a well-resourced and culturally sensitive program; a curriculum that matches the learning needs, languages, priorities and aspirations of Indigenous children in Kindergarten to Grade 12, and that is delivered through culturally appropriate instructional strategies and in appropriate contexts to culture.

In his book Truth and Reconciliation in Canadian Schools, author, Dr. Pamela Rose Toulouse, an Ojibwe / Odawa woman from the community of Sagamok Anishnawbek in Northern Ontario, provides personal ideas, authentic resources, interactive strategies and lesson plans that support Indigenous learners and non-natives in the classroom.

Toulouse has published over 50 educational resources, ranging from books to educational materials.

His book should be a must read for administrators, administrators and educators in the public system.

Toulouse presents a culturally relevant and holistic approach that facilitates relationship building and promotes ways to engage in daily reconciliation activities and perspectives that include residential school history, treaty education, Indigenous contributions, First Nations / Métis / Inuit perspectives and Sacred Circle teachings that can be incorporated into public school curricula.

If our national and global call to action for truth and reconciliation ever comes true, Toulouse’s essential resource for teaching and learning Indigenous history could be one of them. Its text goes “beyond thanks and apologies” to knowledge, culture and contributions to restorative education on and with indigenous peoples. In clear and well-organized language, Toulouse begins by mapping and then explains concepts and methods important to First Nations for meaningful teaching and learning.

But there is more to it. Much more. It is and will continue to be, especially for the next generation, a matter of learning.

As the American poet Amanda Gorman explains so clearly:

“Every day we learn

How to live with gasoline,

not the ease.

How to move in a hurry,

never hate.

How to leave this pain that is beyond us

behind us.

Just like a skill or any art,

We can’t own hope without practicing it

It is the most basic profession that we demand of ourselves.

gfjohnson4@shaw.ca

Geoff Johnson is a former superintendent of schools.


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New schools in preparation for Rhondda Cynon Taf https://eartdocuments.com/new-schools-in-preparation-for-rhondda-cynon-taf/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/new-schools-in-preparation-for-rhondda-cynon-taf/ Education is one of the main responsibilities of local councils in Wales and the United Kingdom. In the Valleys, many projects are underway to create new schools or school places. From a new special school to £ 85million plans for new schools and school buildings to a new middle Welsh primary school, there are plenty […]]]>

Education is one of the main responsibilities of local councils in Wales and the United Kingdom.

In the Valleys, many projects are underway to create new schools or school places.

From a new special school to £ 85million plans for new schools and school buildings to a new middle Welsh primary school, there are plenty of projects underway.

Here we focus on some of the new schools currently planned for Rhondda Cynon Taf that are expected to come to fruition over the next few years.

New primary in Welsh at Rhydyfelin

In November, plans were officially submitted for a new £ 12.5million Welsh-language primary school in Rhydyfelin.

The new school would be built where the current bilingual Heol y Celyn Primary School is located and is part of a larger £ 55million RCT Council education overhaul in the Pontypridd area that would see Heol y Celyn close.

The new school would open in September 2024.

Heol y Celyn is currently a bilingual school and will see a change in the catchment area as the new school will also include students from Ysgol Gynradd Gymraeg Pont Sion Norton which is about five kilometers from Heol y Celyn and is also expected to close under the larger plans for the schools of Pontypridd.

The new school would have a capacity of 540 pupils aged 3 to 11 and 60 places for kindergarten.

Plans also include a new multi-purpose playground, a new playground, staff parking and an on-site bus drop-off area.

New special school at RCT

In October, the consultancy firm gave its support to the project of a new special school in Rhondda Cynon Taf.

The number of special schools in RCT should be increased from four to five in order to create more capacity and reduce the pressure on existing schools.

A review has been carried out on the board’s special school supply and there are currently 600 students entering education in four special schools in RCT.

These are the Maesgwyn special school in Cwmdare, the Park Lane special school in Trecynon, Ysgol Hen Felin in Ystrad and Ysgol Ty Coch in Tonteg which includes a satellite base in Buarth y Capel in Ynysybwl.

The cabinet report said that there had been a steady increase in the number of students at both Ysgol Hen Felin and Ysgol Ty Coch.

£ 85million for new schools in Llanharry, Cymmer, Glyncoch, Penrhys, Llantwit Fardre and Talbot Green

There are plans to spend £ 85million on new schools and school buildings in the Rhondda Cynon Taf areas.

The proposed projects include the modernization and replacement of the majority of the existing buildings at Ysgol Llanhari, the creation of a new 3-19 school throughout at the existing Ysgol Cwm Rhondda site or the construction of a brand new school on an alternative site, and a new primary school in English. provision for Glyncoch to replace the two existing schools.

They also include a new special school to meet growing demand and new 21st century schools for Penrhys Primary, Maesybryn Primary in Llantwit Fardre and Tonysguboriau Primary in Talbot Green.

They are part of the latest plans for the council’s 21st Century Schools program

New school buildings in Llantrisant, Llantwit Fardre and Pontyclun

In July, it was revealed that the board would seek funding for new buildings for three RCT schools.

The cabinet-approved report suggested that the council submit a business case to the Welsh government to fund three new school buildings in Llantrisant, Llantwit Fardre and Pontyclun.

The 21st century school projects would relate to the primary schools of Penygawsi, Llanilltud Faerdref and Pontyclun.

They would be funded through a Mutual Investment Model (MIM) that involves private sector partners who build and maintain public assets, and in return, the council backed by Welsh government funding will pay a fee to the private partner, which will cover the cost of construction, maintenance and financing of the project.

At the end of the 25-year contract period, the assets revert to the board.

The cabinet report said the three schools are in areas of rapid housing development and all need investment to become fully accessible and up to 21st century school standards.

He also said that all three have access issues and are at the end of their useful life and it is hoped that schools can be designed to meet all requirements for Net Zero Carbon goals.

The goal is to get planning approval by December 2021 for all three and, if successful, the planned construction period for each school is expected to extend from summer 2022 to early 2024.

To get the latest WalesOnline news delivered straight to your inbox, click here.


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Zambian college and university professors complete US-backed graduate literacy course https://eartdocuments.com/zambian-college-and-university-professors-complete-us-backed-graduate-literacy-course/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 07:56:49 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/zambian-college-and-university-professors-complete-us-backed-graduate-literacy-course/ LUSAKA, Zambia – The United States Government, through the Transforming Teacher Education Project of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and in partnership with the University of Zambia and Florida State University , completed the delivery of a graduate literacy course designed to help build the capacity of Zambia’s colleges of education. (COE) […]]]>

LUSAKA, ZambiaThe United States Government, through the Transforming Teacher Education Project of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and in partnership with the University of Zambia and Florida State University , completed the delivery of a graduate literacy course designed to help build the capacity of Zambia’s colleges of education. (COE) and universities.

More than 70 literacy and language teaching teachers in centers of excellence and universities successfully completed the course on December 2, in addition to representatives from the Ministry of Education. The course aims to build reading expertise in the early years of study in Zambia across all colleges and universities that train primary teachers.

The graduate literacy course gave participants a better understanding of the research behind Zambia’s reading program – the Primary Literacy Program – which supports the principles of mother tongue-based multilingual education. in Early Childhood Education and Grades 1-4. Participants applied their understanding of language and literacy research. into practical strategies to teach reading more effectively in the early grades, use assessment data to guide instruction, train teachers in evidence-based literacy practices, and better conduct their own research on literacy topics.

Comprised of over 130 hours of training, the course included 105 hours of face-to-face instruction and additional individualized research support for each participant. All conducted in accordance with national COVID-19 guidelines, each participant chose a research topic and was assigned a research mentor who will continue to help them apply their research findings in their professional roles. The research projects will be presented at a closing conference in Lusaka in March 2022.

USAID Transforming Teacher Education is the US government’s flagship partnership for higher education in Zambia. To learn more about the project, visit: USAID.gov/Zambia.


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Chicago Slow To Change Named Schools For Slave Owners Illinois News https://eartdocuments.com/chicago-slow-to-change-named-schools-for-slave-owners-illinois-news/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 16:49:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/chicago-slow-to-change-named-schools-for-slave-owners-illinois-news/ CHICAGO (AP) – Chicago public school officials changed the name of just one of the 30 schools named for slave owners, a year after a senior district official recognized the issue as “dehumanizing.” according to a newspaper article. The Chicago Sun-Times conducted an analysis last year showing that of 652 public schools, 30 were named […]]]>

CHICAGO (AP) – Chicago public school officials changed the name of just one of the 30 schools named for slave owners, a year after a senior district official recognized the issue as “dehumanizing.” according to a newspaper article.

The Chicago Sun-Times conducted an analysis last year showing that of 652 public schools, 30 were named after those who owned or traded black or native slaves. Schools are located in different parts of the city and include campuses with a majority of black students. So far at school, Andrew Jackson Language Academy on the city’s West Side has removed the name of the Seventh President, who has enslaved people. The school was renamed Chicago World Language Academy in May.

The newspaper presented its findings last year to Maurice Swinney, who was appointed the district’s first equity officer in October 2018. Swinney said he was not aware of the number of linked school names to slave owners, called it “dehumanizing” and said the names need to be changed. He declined recent requests for an interview with the newspaper.

A district spokesperson attributed the name change delays to the coronavirus pandemic.

District officials “are still working on the policy that will go to the board and public comment, so we don’t have much to share at this time,” the CPS spokesperson said, Mary Fergus, at the newspaper. “It’s not because it hasn’t been important, but, with COVID and the reopening of schools and everything, it took priority.”

Political cartoons

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Cannelloni was my grandmother’s language of love. Then the pandemic hit https://eartdocuments.com/cannelloni-was-my-grandmothers-language-of-love-then-the-pandemic-hit/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 16:56:31 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/cannelloni-was-my-grandmothers-language-of-love-then-the-pandemic-hit/ This first-person column is written by Jessica Magonet who lives in Vancouver. For more information on CBC’s first-person stories, please visit the faq. On Valentine’s Day, one of the people I love the most in the world told me that she loved me for the first time. This person is my 96 year old grandmother. […]]]>

This first-person column is written by Jessica Magonet who lives in Vancouver. For more information on CBC’s first-person stories, please visit the faq.

On Valentine’s Day, one of the people I love the most in the world told me that she loved me for the first time. This person is my 96 year old grandmother.

She lives on the other side of the country, which often felt like she was on the other side of the world during the pandemic. We haven’t seen each other for over a year because of COVID. It was the longest we have ever been separated.

I could have missed the “I love you” if I hadn’t been paying attention. My grandmother slipped it casually at the end of a call. I was so surprised that I almost didn’t answer. His words left me silent and stunned. But I pulled myself together and told her I missed her and loved her too. And then I hung up and texted my cousins.

Me: Grandma just told me “I love you” for the first time. I’m shocked. I always tell her I love her, but she just says, “the same for you.”

Alex: OMG, hilarious but true.

Lauren: When I tell Grandma I love her, all I get is a thank you!

Alex: He must really miss you.

She did it.

It wasn’t the first sign.

At first, it was the deluge of voicemail messages. After the pandemic my grandmother started calling me all the time. She would call while I was working when I couldn’t answer, so she would fill my mailbox with voicemail messages about recipes. “Jessica, this is very important,” the messages began. “You have to make pizza tonight. Call me and I’ll give you my recipe.

I would call her back and of course she couldn’t read me the pizza recipe she scribbled decades ago on a now crumbling card because my grandmother has very limited vision. But she could ask my mom to email it to me.

Jessica Magonet, right, with her grandmother on her 90th birthday in Montreal in 2015 (Jessica Magonet)

I never doubted my grandma loved me before her monumental Valentine’s Day announcement, even though it meant the world to me to hear her say those words out loud. I hoped they would open the door to more honesty and privacy in our relationship.

But I always knew she was one of the people who loved me the most. The feeling is mutual. I cherish my childhood memories of spending time with her, taking the Montreal metro, visiting La Ronde, cooking in her kitchen. When I was eight, my parents separated, and my mother and I moved in with my grandparents for a while. I remember the school lunches my grandmother carefully prepared for me. Fagioli pasta, meatball sandwiches, minestrone. I remember Sundays in her dining room, sharing gnocchi in tomato sauce. His love anchored me during an extremely difficult time.

My grandmother always showed her love through deeds rather than words. By actions I mean cooking. Her parents immigrated to Montreal from Casacalenda, Italy, and she has kept the tradition of Italian cuisine alive in our family.

Here are the cannelloni that Jessica Magonet prepared with the virtual help of her grandmother for Christmas 2020. (Jessica Magonet)

My grandmother, the cannelloni hotline

Last Christmas was the first Christmas I ever spent without my grandmother.

She usually cooks an Italian feast for our family on Christmas Day. While we weren’t able to get together last year due to pandemic restrictions, she still made sure everyone enjoyed her famous homemade cannelloni for Christmas dinner.

She bought me a pasta machine and spent the days leading up to Christmas Day on FaceTime with her children and grandchildren, advising us on the texture of the pasta dough and the thickness of the bechamel sauce. Often the line was busy when I called for help because they were discussing the recipe with someone else. “Grandma,” I told her, “you’re a cannelloni hotline! ”

It was also the first time that I made cannelloni on my own. I had always done this with my grandmother, my mother, my uncles, my cousins ​​- one person stirring the tomato sauce, another spreading the dough. I knew how to make parts of the recipe, but I had never learned how it all comes together. With the help of my grandmother, I cracked the code.

I thought the “I love you” my grandmother gave me on Valentine’s Day, brought on by our long pandemic separation, would be a one-time event. I was wrong. I call my grandma all the time to talk about recipes.

She tells me that she loves me almost every time we speak.


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School with seven students in neighborhood ravaged by second homes closes for the last time https://eartdocuments.com/school-with-seven-students-in-neighborhood-ravaged-by-second-homes-closes-for-the-last-time/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 16:35:35 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/school-with-seven-students-in-neighborhood-ravaged-by-second-homes-closes-for-the-last-time/ A primary school in Pen Llŷn will close its doors for good on Wednesday. Ysgol Abersoch in the village of Abersoch has been a refuge for students aged three to eight for almost a century. However, after 97 years, the school had to say goodbye to its seven students following a Gwynedd council vote to […]]]>

A primary school in Pen Llŷn will close its doors for good on Wednesday.

Ysgol Abersoch in the village of Abersoch has been a refuge for students aged three to eight for almost a century.

However, after 97 years, the school had to say goodbye to its seven students following a Gwynedd council vote to move forward with its closure.

The school’s future was unsustainable due to funding and a shortage of students, largely due “to years of immigration and the use of so many second homes,” the council said.

It was announced that the school would be closed by the end of the term.

Read more: Back to school start in January delayed in Wales due to Omicron fears

Ysgol Abersoch principal Linda Jones said she felt emotional on the last day of school, which she described as “difficult”.

“It is hard to believe that this is actually happening and that there will be no more children here after today,” she told WalesOnline.

Linda has been the principal of the school for almost five years. Having been a student at Ysgol Abersoch herself, she said that becoming the principal of the school was a “dream come true”.

“I have so many fond memories of coming here as a student,” she explained.



Principal Linda Jones described her work at the school as a “dream come true”.

“Drinking milk from glass bottles, painting on Friday afternoons, playing outside in the field – there were two tree trunks and there was a hole in one and you could fit through. 30 students at the time.

“My dream has always been to become a manager. I taught at nearby Ysgol Chwilog for almost 25 years when a temporary job as principal of this school arose. principal of this school.

“I felt like I was living the dream and being able to come back to Abersoch was the icing on the cake.”

The small wooden school, located in the heart of the village, was three years away from celebrating its 100th anniversary.

In September of this year, the council’s decision to close the Welsh language school was reviewed by a key council committee. Concerns were expressed by the local community, who had been campaigning to keep it open, alongside language activists fearing its impact on Welsh culture in the popular seaside village.



Gwynedd council decided to close the school in September despite backlash from the local community and Welsh language activists.

The school educates children until the end of the third school year, before moving to Ysgol Sarn Bach, located 2.2 km away.

Decision markers pointed out that no major increase in pupil numbers meant the future of the school had been ‘vulnerable for some time’, costing the authority £ 17,404 per pupil compared to the average County from £ 4,198.

In early December, the school’s principals decided to resign en masse after refusing to allow staff layoffs, calling it a “last insult” to a council that had fiercely opposed the school’s closure.

Governing Chairman Margot Jones called the school’s closure “heartbreaking.”

“I see enormous value in a small village school, especially in a community like Abersoch,” she explained.

“It’s a wonderful advertisement and an ambassador of the Welsh language. What remains of the community after this could only serve tourists and we have fought so hard against that for so long.

“All of our suggestions and ideas for developing the school were ignored. This school was there to educate people who have a sense of belonging to the area and who cannot be replicated.



Ysgol Abersoch is an ‘ambassador of the Welsh language’ according to the former chairman of the governors, Margot Jones.

“The council has turned its back on us.

“I am absolutely devastated and I can’t believe this is happening. It is definitely not in the best interests of the children and I feel like it was all for naught – our voices have gone. been ignored. “

Parent Awen Jones, whose three sons went to school, agrees.

“I am disappointed because I feel like we are the only people who have tried to keep this school open and the Welsh language alive,” she said.

“I felt really lonely sometimes and it’s so sad to come to this.

“As parents we have a good community here – we all get along and depend on each other to support us. My four year old son Bobby has been crying all day – he doesn’t understand why school closed.

“It’s up to us now to keep this community alive.”



Parents, teachers and governors of Ysgol Abersoch are said to be devastated by the decision to close the school at the end of the term.

On December 17, Ysgol Abersoch organized an open day to mark the last days of school. Former students and parents were invited to share their memories of the place.

For Linda Jones, the closure will have a profound effect not only on those with a connection to the school, but on the community as a whole.

She said: “We have a tight-knit family community here at school. Everyone knows each other, it’s like a big extended family and the children almost become like your own children.

“I can’t even imagine what this closure will mean for the rest of the community, especially the Welsh language. We campaigned so much for the Welsh language because there is a lot of English here. a precious gem for the Welsh Language.



Ysgol Abersoch in the seaside village of Abersoch in Pen Llyn is closing for the last time.

“The community I grew up in was very different from the community we have today, but the school was where the root of the language remained. We have families here of Russian, Iraqi descent. and Czech – they can also speak different languages ​​besides Welsh and English.

“The school motto is ‘Hwylio i’r Dyfodol’, which means ‘sail into the future’ – there is a bittersweet irony with what is happening today. I hope people don’t ‘will never forget the deep roots of this school in the community, further It is woven into the good memories we have, the language we speak and the lessons we have learned.

“Wherever these kids are in the future, I hope they take it all with them, as I did too.”



Gwynedd Council Headquarters in Caernarfon, Gwynedd

Gwynedd Council has said considering the future of any school in the county is a “difficult decision.”

A spokesperson said: “The Council, as an education authority, has a duty to ensure that we provide the best education and experiences possible as well as the best learning environment for all children in the county. .

“A number of meetings have been held with representatives from Ysgol Abersoch in order to address a range of concerns regarding the school and possible options for future education in the region.

“The review of Ysgol Abersoch’s situation was not part of a broader strategy for education in the region, but rather a response to a particular concern about the challenges facing the school, particularly the weak number of students, projections, high percentage of excess places, small class size and large age range within classes.

“Following statutory consultation and careful consideration of all comments presented, it was decided to close Ysgol Abersoch on December 31 and offer places to students at Ysgol Sarn Bach.”

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Dr Laurie Slovarp on Prevention and Suppression of Chronic Cough Events https://eartdocuments.com/dr-laurie-slovarp-on-prevention-and-suppression-of-chronic-cough-events/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 15:01:47 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/dr-laurie-slovarp-on-prevention-and-suppression-of-chronic-cough-events/ Most people know what triggers their chronic cough and how to temporarily suppress it, said Laurie Slovarp, PhD, CCC-SLP, associate professor in the School of Speech, Language, Hearing and Occupational Sciences at the University of Montana. Transcription Do patients with chronic cough usually know what they are sensitive to or is this included in the […]]]>

Most people know what triggers their chronic cough and how to temporarily suppress it, said Laurie Slovarp, PhD, CCC-SLP, associate professor in the School of Speech, Language, Hearing and Occupational Sciences at the University of Montana.

Transcription

Do patients with chronic cough usually know what they are sensitive to or is this included in the treatment?

Some patients are very conscious, others are not. I find that most people who are really sensitive to smells are quite aware of it, especially when I ask them things like “do you skip the soap aisle at the grocery store?” Or “Do you avoid going to Bath and Body Works?” And even though I asked them, “Do you know what triggers your cough?” they can even say “No”, but then I ask them that question and then they say, “Oh, yes, I do”. So, some people are really conscious, but others are not at all. Some patients will say that they don’t feel it coming, as if there was no warning. But then, during the shoot, right in front of me, I can tell that a cough is coming and I can show it to them and say, “You see, you know that. You feel it coming because I can tell that you are trying to. not to cough right now. ” So much of the therapy also increases their awareness of what feeling is coming, even if it is very brief, but also what is causing you to cough.

Do patients generally realize that there is something they can do to stop their chronic cough?

It’s pretty common for people to say, “Well, sometimes clean water helps. “Sometimes I have a few patients who have said,” If I breathe in a certain way, I can make it go away. But this is not very common. The other thing is, even if they’ve found a way to remove it, it’s usually only temporary because the removal, especially at first, can take a while. So I say to people, “You may have to do this particular breathing strategy for 2-3 minutes before the feeling goes away. And usually when they try to suppress, it’s only for a few seconds to a minute, during which they just try to get to another room so they can cough. Usually they feel like they can push it off for a little while, but not completely. And they were never told that if they succeeded in removing systematically, it would be an effective treatment.


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