Language skills – Eart Documents http://eartdocuments.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 02:27:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://eartdocuments.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-07-01T001347.882.png Language skills – Eart Documents http://eartdocuments.com/ 32 32 Library Corner, November 23 edition https://eartdocuments.com/library-corner-november-23-edition/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 02:19:09 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/library-corner-november-23-edition/ For more information about any of the following programs or other activities at the library, visit hopkintonlibrary.org. The library can also be found on Facebook, @hopkintonlibrary, and on Twitter, @HopkintonPLMA. Calendar updateThe library will be closed for the Thanksgiving holiday from Thursday, November 24 through Sunday, November 27. There may also be an early closing […]]]>

For more information about any of the following programs or other activities at the library, visit hopkintonlibrary.org. The library can also be found on Facebook, @hopkintonlibrary, and on Twitter, @HopkintonPLMA.

Calendar update
The library will be closed for the Thanksgiving holiday from Thursday, November 24 through Sunday, November 27. There may also be an early closing on Wednesday, November 23.

The Camp David Accords
Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2 p.m.-3 p.m.
This virtual program contextualizes the diplomatic, economic, cultural, and military interactions among empires, nations, and peoples in the 20th century that shaped America’s increasingly important role in the world and set the stage for peace accords. Camp David.

Freedom Team Book Club
Tuesday, Nov. 29, 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
Each month, members of the Freedom Team Book Club read a book about prejudice, discrimination or inequity. Check the library’s website calendar for more information. This program is recommended for ages 16 and up.

Conversation Circles
Thursday, December 1, 2-3 p.m.
Conversation Circles will focus on learning basic English skills. Learners will practice vocabulary, pronunciation and grammar in a fun, comfortable and relaxed environment. Each class will use guided conversations and real-life situations to build language confidence.

ELL for the Advanced Learner – Zoom
Thursday, December 1, 6-7 p.m.
ELL for the advanced learner – at the library
Friday, December 2, 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
ELL for the Advanced Learner will focus on creating greater fluency through informal conversation, focused discussion, and cultural experiences. The atmosphere is relaxed and allows the learner to progress at their own level of comfort.

Democracy talks: Russian invasion, Ukrainian resistance, prospects for peace
Tuesday, December 6, 7-8 p.m.
This virtual program will focus on a discussion of the reasons behind Russian President Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine, Ukraine’s determined resistance, and how the war might end.

About the author: Geraldine Brooks
Tuesday, December 6, 7-8 p.m.
This virtual/hybrid program will include an online chat with highly acclaimed and award-winning novelist Geraldine Brooks in conversation about her latest New York Times bestselling novel, “Horse.”

Classical Music 101
Coming in January
For anyone who loves classical music and wants to learn more, Friends of the Library is sponsoring Classical Music 101, a free eight-week online course starting in January. Registration begins December 5 on the library’s website. For more details, visit hopkintonlibraryfriends.org.

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Postponement of language proficiency test affects Vietnamese workers traveling to Japan https://eartdocuments.com/postponement-of-language-proficiency-test-affects-vietnamese-workers-traveling-to-japan/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 06:12:17 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/postponement-of-language-proficiency-test-affects-vietnamese-workers-traveling-to-japan/ Pham Duc Vuong, deputy director of Hanoi-based Hoang Long Investment Construction and Manpower Supply JSC (Hoang Long CMS), said his company now had to suspend efforts to help 15 people who had applied for a program to work as trainee caregivers. in Japan. To qualify for the program, they must pass Level 4 (4Q) of […]]]>

Pham Duc Vuong, deputy director of Hanoi-based Hoang Long Investment Construction and Manpower Supply JSC (Hoang Long CMS), said his company now had to suspend efforts to help 15 people who had applied for a program to work as trainee caregivers. in Japan.

To qualify for the program, they must pass Level 4 (4Q) of the NAT Japanese Language Test or N4 of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT), as 15 Hoang Long CMS trainees have already registered for a language next month. , although it was postponed.

The Ministry of Education sent a circular to localities across the country on Nov. 8, announcing that institutions holding Chinese, Japanese, Korean and English language proficiency exams in Vietnam must suspend operations pending official permission to proceed.

The NAT-Test is held in even months while the JLPT is held twice a month in July and December.

For now, the NAT-Test organizer has said it will be suspended until next February while it is unclear when the JLPT will resume.

Vuong said getting the certificate is the first step in the process to work as interns in Japan.

It takes about four months from when applicants receive the paper to when they are sent to work in Japan, and with the exam postponed, the whole process will be delayed.

Although the company and the workers are concerned, they can do nothing but wait, he said.

Nguyen Xuan Lanh, deputy director of HCMC-based Esuhai Co., Ltd, which sends about 12,000 Vietnamese workers to Japan following the internship program, said the sudden suspension of Japanese language proficiency exams has had a significant impact on export workers.

He specifies that the company generally makes the trainees apply for the JLPT and that if the test is not organized in December, they will have to wait until next July.

Kim Hoa, who oversees worker recruitment for a company that sends mechanical workers to Japan, said 10 trainees were unable to obtain the N5 certificate despite registering for the test.

Nguyen Gia Liem, deputy head of the overseas labor management department of the Ministry of Labour, Invalids and Welfare, said workers going to Japan, depending on each industry and depending on whether whether or not the Japanese company requires a language certificate will be affected by the suspension of exams.

Those who are not affected by the language test can continue to Japan.

Japan instituted the Technical Training Internship Program in 1993 to facilitate the transfer of skills, technology and knowledge to developing regions.

More than 600,000 Vietnamese work in 50 countries and territories, including 250,000 in Japan, 230,000 in Taiwan and 40,000 in South Korea.

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Art, Drama, Languages ​​and Geography to Become ‘Private School Reserve’ as Public Sector Reduces Its Bite | School funding https://eartdocuments.com/art-drama-languages-and-geography-to-become-private-school-reserve-as-public-sector-reduces-its-bite-school-funding/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 17:42:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/art-drama-languages-and-geography-to-become-private-school-reserve-as-public-sector-reduces-its-bite-school-funding/ Subjects such as German, French, art, drama and design technology could soon be closed to many public school students as school leaders say they are being forced to cut classes costly and less popular to address crippling deficits. The vast majority of English state schools expect to be in the red by next school year, […]]]>

Subjects such as German, French, art, drama and design technology could soon be closed to many public school students as school leaders say they are being forced to cut classes costly and less popular to address crippling deficits.

The vast majority of English state schools expect to be in the red by next school year, driven by huge energy bills and an unfunded pay rise for teachers.

Thousands of schools are now planning to lay off teachers and teaching assistants or cut their hours. But unions and headteachers say that with schools forced to increase class sizes, subject choice in secondary schools will suffer as headteachers will scrap lessons that have lower attendance and are less economical to teach.

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said: “The subjects that we have always considered to be culturally very important will increasingly become the preserve of private schools because public schools do not have the ways to teach them.

He told the Observer that subjects which attract fewer pupils at GCSE and A level, including theatre, art, German and French, would all be at risk of being scrapped, as “one teacher for 20 children will no longer be viable “.

Topics like design technology, which is expensive because schools have to buy equipment and classes can’t be large for safety reasons, would also be at risk, he said.

He warned that valuable subjects would quietly disappear. “Heads don’t want to discourage parents by admitting they cut GCSE German because they can’t afford it. But it’s happening.”

Will Teece, Principal of Brookvale Groby Learning Campus, a secondary academy in Leicester, said: “We are certainly looking at our choices after 16 and subjects with small groups and high staff costs which we will have to lose.” He said: ‘You have to have someone in front of the pupils to keep the class sizes going up. I don’t know how schools are going to manage if the halls aren’t big enough.

Subjects for which schools must purchase materials are also at risk. Photograph: April O’Reilly/Alamy

George McMillan, executive director of Harris academy schools in Greenwich and Ockendon in Essex, said: “For A level we are already in a position where for subjects to work financially you need at least 100 students in each age group. Anything that isn’t popular enough can’t run.

He said many schools were already asking staff to teach subjects outside their major due to teacher shortages, and this would increase due to the funding crisis. “Science is often taught by PE teachers; computer science, for which it was difficult to find teachers for many years, is taught by math teachers, often reluctantly,” he said. “If it’s permanent, it becomes soul destroying for the staff and they leave.”

He said academies were terrified of being put under special measures by Ofsted for not delivering a broad enough curriculum, but there was not enough money or staff to do it properly.

He predicted schools would try to save money by replacing a ‘really good experienced teacher’ with someone just starting out.

But he warned that with the number of new trainees starting initial secondary teacher training down 23% this year from 2019, “even finding a first-time teacher is difficult”.

Adam Watt, Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Professor of French at the University of Exeter, said: “If opportunities to develop language skills become the preserve of those who can afford a private education, it will significantly reduce the potential of our future workforce.”

He argued that learning languages ​​like French and German at school teaches young people “communication skills, multitasking, flexibility of thought and, above all, awareness and openness to difference”.

A DfE spokesperson said core funding for schools this year included a £4billion cash boost which will help them deliver a “broad and balanced curriculum”.

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Local events celebrate poetry during Native American Heritage Month https://eartdocuments.com/local-events-celebrate-poetry-during-native-american-heritage-month/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 05:01:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/local-events-celebrate-poetry-during-native-american-heritage-month/ Bill Castanier In case you missed celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day last month, the entire month of November is Native American Heritage Month, established by President George HW Bush in 1990. October alone is more dedicated to the Columbus Day reconquest of the Americas to celebrate the First Nations who inhabited the Americas before the landing […]]]>

Bill Castanier

In case you missed celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day last month, the entire month of November is Native American Heritage Month, established by President George HW Bush in 1990. October alone is more dedicated to the Columbus Day reconquest of the Americas to celebrate the First Nations who inhabited the Americas before the landing of Christopher Columbus.

Among natives, Columbus Day was seen as an insult to native inhabitants and was often the weight of native humor. You’ve probably seen a twist on the “tourists are going home” memes and t-shirts.


Locally, Heritage Month will be celebrated by several Native poets reading and leading a workshop on Native American poetry at two locations: the Nokomis Center in Meridian Township and the university’s United Methodist Church. In Michigan, Native American poetry dates back to Jane Johnston Schoolcraft, considered the first Native American literary writer. Jane Johnston was the wife of Henry Schoolcraft, the Dominion Indian Agent in Sault Ste. Married. Author Robert Dale Parker wrote “The Sound the Stars Make Rushing Through the Sky” about his life.
Recently, Indigenous poetry reached a new level when Joy Harjo, a member of the Muscogee Nation, served three terms as the Nation’s Poet Laureate. Continuing in this tradition, Aboriginal poets Gordon Henry Jr., Mark Turcotte and Rosalie Sanara Petrouske will read poetry and lead a writing workshop with a grant from the Greater Lansing Arts Council. The project will showcase the work of emerging and experienced Native American poets. On Nov. 19 at 4 p.m., MSU English professor Henry will lead a poetry workshop, “Living Nations, Living Words,” at the Nokomis Learning Center in Okemos. The workshop is free and open to the public but limited to 30 participants.

On Nov. 20 at 4 p.m., a special program, “We Are the Wind: Native American Poetry,” will be hosted at the University’s United Methodist Church Sanctuary in East Lansing by Henry and will feature Mark Turcotte, professor at DePaul University and formerly Lansing; Rosalie Sanara Petrouske and Zoe Johnson, MSU graduate, flash fiction writer and poet. Lansing Poetry Club is sponsoring the free event.

The month is also a good time to visit the Nokomis Cultural Heritage Center, dedicated to history, arts, culture and the language of the Anishinaabe people. In addition to language skills, the center offers programs ranging from sweetgrass weaving to ribbon skirt making.

Nokomis is also becoming a center of research for those wishing to pursue their Indian heritage thanks to the recent donation of its articles, databases and books by James LaLone. He spent decades recreating the genealogy of more than 30,000 Native American descendants in Michigan.
For those who want to deepen the history and culture of Aboriginal nations through books, several authors take the plunge, N. Scott Momaday (“House Made of Dawn”); Louise Erdrich (“Love Medicine”); his sister Heid Erdrich (“Little Big Bully”); Joy Harjo, (“An American Sunrise”), Tommy Orange, “Over There”; Sherman Alexie (“The Absolute True Diary of a Part-Time Indian”); Gerald Vizenor (“Bearheart”); with nonfiction writers Vine Deloria Jr., his son Phillip Deloria; and David Treuer (“The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee”). First-time author Angeline Boulley recently penned one of the most heralded young adult novels, “Firekeepers Daughter,” about a young woman’s life on the reservation.
Vine Deloria’s provocatively titled book “Custer Died For Your Sins” served as an Indian manifesto when it was written in 1969 during the early days of the American Indian
movement.

His son’s book “Playing Indian” is one of the best looks at the objectification of American Indians through sports teams, school mascots and advertising.
Momaday’s “House Made of Dawn” won the Pulitzer Prize in 1969. Other Native American writers who contributed include James Welch (“Winter in the Blood”), Russell Means (“Where White Men Fear to Tread”) and Susan Power (“grass dancer”).
Additionally, a new book, “Indigenous Continent,” by Oxford University historian Pekka Hamalainen, rewrites the common misperception about the American Indian challenge to colonialism.
Henry, a member of the White Earth Anishinaabe Nation in Minnesota, wrote the highly acclaimed ‘Light People’ (1994) and a new 2022 poetry collection, ‘Spirit Matters: White Clay, Red Exits, Distant Others’.
Turcotte, a Turtle Mountain Ojibway, is the author of four books of poetry, including “The Feathered Heart,” and was guest writer-in-residence at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Rosalie Sanara Petrouske, who identifies as Ojibwe, is the author of “What We Keep” and “A Postcard from my Mother”. She is working on a collection of poetry inspired by the Indian School Movement.

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IUST conducts community and industry outreach programs https://eartdocuments.com/iust-conducts-community-and-industry-outreach-programs/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 21:50:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/iust-conducts-community-and-industry-outreach-programs/ Awantipora, November 6: As part of its flagship community and industry outreach initiatives, the Islamic University of Science and Technology (IUST) has organized two extensive programs to continue its efforts to bridge the gap between academia, industry and community. Two such events were held this week, including a workshop on Modern Learning and Arabic Language […]]]>

Awantipora, November 6: As part of its flagship community and industry outreach initiatives, the Islamic University of Science and Technology (IUST) has organized two extensive programs to continue its efforts to bridge the gap between academia, industry and community. Two such events were held this week, including a workshop on Modern Learning and Arabic Language Skills for Eastern Islamic Centers and a special session on “New Product Development Insights” as part of the industry-Outreach.

The main speaker on the new product development was Manoj Pareek, Head of R&D (Health Food Drink Category) and R&D Site Manager, Hindustan Unilever Limited, Gurugram. During this session, he focused on the global food trends of 2023, which include health and well-being, nutritional quality, environmental friendliness and food sustainability. While emphasizing the need for innovative research, Pareek noted that food quality and nutritional value must be taken into consideration. As an expert in food technology, he said, one must research consumer needs and then create an innovative nutritious solution possible without compromising environmental sustainability.

Addressing the participants, Professor Lily Want (Dean Outreach IUST) said: “CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) involves economic and ethical values. IUST has made “CSR” an integral part of academics with a focus on community connection, alumni connection, career guidance and industry connection, and ushered in a new ecosystem of learning, d ‘opportunities and inspiration’. She applauded the university for its innovative initiatives to facilitate placements for its students and expose them to in-demand technical and professional skills for various industries and help them identify employment options that match their career options.

“IUST has regularly organized joint events, workshops, seminars, conferences and interactive sessions to share information on the emphasis on action research-based solutions to community issues,” Dr. Amir said. Hussain Dar (Coordinate, Industry Connect, IUST).

The Department of Arabic Language and Literature at IUST organized a workshop for Eastern Islamic Centers, with the aim of exposing them to modern language learning and equipping them with basic Arabic skills.

“In addition to Arabic language skills, our goal was also to improve participants’ skills in English language, personality development and time management,” said Dr. Inayat Rasool, Head of Language Department and Arabic Literature, IUST. The program was coordinated by Dr. Irshad A Mir, Department Community Outreach Coordinator.

Speaking on the occasion, Shazana Andrabi (IUST Coordinator, Community Connect) encouraged participants to explore more opportunities to improve their language skills and other communication skills as this can help them communicate more effectively. .

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The communication skills of Kenyan athletes are strategic for our national interest https://eartdocuments.com/the-communication-skills-of-kenyan-athletes-are-strategic-for-our-national-interest/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 10:21:06 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/the-communication-skills-of-kenyan-athletes-are-strategic-for-our-national-interest/ The 2015 Boston Marathon is coming to an end, Caroline Cherotich, Mare Dibaba and Buzunesh Deba are running towards the finish line and each of them can win, then after the last corner Mare is moving slowly, Deba is falling behind and now c It’s a race between Caroline and Mare, almost close to the […]]]>

The 2015 Boston Marathon is coming to an end, Caroline Cherotich, Mare Dibaba and Buzunesh Deba are running towards the finish line and each of them can win, then after the last corner Mare is moving slowly, Deba is falling behind and now c It’s a race between Caroline and Mare, almost close to the last fifty meters, Cherotich suddenly displays a burst of energy, it’s unbelievable that she has just run 42 km but with the ultimate prize looming and the story behind waiting for her, nothing can stop her, she is now moving forward and crossing the finish line, this is another victory for a Kenyan athlete in a major marathon and the world joins her in celebrating the victory.

Then comes the moment that many are waiting for; a chance to speak to the world and frame their victory in a way only champions can. The interviewer asks her questions and the 2015 Boston Women’s Marathon champion struggles to come up with relevant answers. To be fair to her, she does a much better job than her compatriots who won major races in the months leading up to her victory, but one key aspect that came out in the interview was her inability to answer questions and frame its content within the objective of its current triumph.

Over the past four decades, the ability to communicate effectively has challenged thousands of elite Kenyan athletes and robbed them of the many opportunities that sporting stardom affords others, especially their hemispheric competitors. western. Some of these opportunities come in the form of corporate sponsorships, paid sponsorships to serve as spokespersons for various global causes, and of course highly paid speaking engagements. Considering that Kenyan athletes will continue to dominate the tracks, this current state of affairs must change; it is essential that the communication skills of our athletes are beyond reproach.

In order to understand the reasons for the current state of affairs and come up with helpful interventions, let’s take a trip to the birthplace of running in Kenya. Athletics is synonymous with the North Rift region. In fact, it is estimated that there are fifteen thousand athletes in the North Rift and that 75% of Kenya’s sports income comes from this region. In 2012, eighteen of the top fifty earning men in the world and eleven of the top fifty women hailed from the North Rift. (These are earnings calculated at over $500,000 over an athlete’s competitive lifetime) On top of that in 2012 at the Olympics, North Rift athletes won five gold medals.

The great interest in athletics in the North Rift began when the IAAF liberalized its amateur rules in the mid-1970s and a few Kenyans started earning large sums of money in Europe, Asia and the United States. United. When the incomes started coming back to Kenya, it had a galvanizing effect on thousands of young men and women, who saw an opportunity to acquire unimaginable wealth and they started training with fierce dedication. Additionally, the availability of US college athletic scholarships and increased prize money and appearance fees have had the effect of boosting interest and participation throughout the Rift Valley. Young athletes left the North Rift region as young, inexperienced villagers and after a few races returned as millionaires.

The fact that so many of the young athletes who eventually became world champions had limited education and exposure prior to their rise to the world stage was a major contributing factor to their poor communication skills. Their sudden social and economic advancement did not correlate with the communication skills required at such high levels and this factor was mentioned as a major aspect ultimately limiting the growth of their personal brands. In the long term, this had a negative impact on their earning potential against their competitors from Western countries. Many sports analysts unanimously agree that if the communication skills of Kenyan athletes improved, the limits of their possibilities would be greatly expanded.

That is why I am proposing that in 2015 the national government, North Rift County governments and the Kenyan business sector take deliberate action to help Kenyan athletes develop their communication skills, it is simply in our national interest to do so. Here’s why!

Kenyan athletes have been our country’s best ambassadors; they are recognized as heroes in many world capitals where they have won many races. This positive representation of our athletes can be exploited by the government in two ways; the fame of the athletes can be leveraged to showcase Kenya’s tourism sector and secondly the government can help them to increase their income which will definitely have an impact on economic growth.

Kenya’s struggling tourism sector can benefit by ensuring that whenever athletes win, the resulting media interest is well managed and athletes can invoke strategic talking points aimed at highlighting key attractions and arouse the interest of potential tourists. For example, they can frame their victory talks in compelling narratives fusing their incredible life stories, with their journeys normally starting from the attractive highlands of Kenya’s Rift Valley to training camps in the North Rift and with proper training in communication even manage to connect Kenya’s global tourist attractions. This can extend to the many ceremonial speeches whose potential reach to a vast global audience in a coordinated and eloquent way can be far more impactful than the costly public relations and media publicity that the Department of Tourism organizes. every year.

Secondly, when it comes to athletes impacting Kenya’s economic growth, it is interesting to highlight that research has found a direct correlation with athletes’ overall brand value measured in paid mentions and their skills in communication. According to Track Profile, during the years 2005-2010, $46,000,000 or (Ksh 4,278,000,000) in total prize money per year was awarded and Kenyan athletes received no less than 25% of this total each year. This equates to around $11,500,000 or (Ksh 1,069,500,000) every year, and this does not even include appearance fees and endorsement deals which are normally kept confidential but in many cases have much higher value than the cash prize.

According to Road Race Management’s ranking and prize list, the 2010 prize money was $7,452,227 and Kenyan riders made up about 50% of the total prize money. These numbers also don’t include appearance fees and endorsement deals. To contextualize the effect these amounts have had in Kenya, we can look at the city of Eldoret, home to the North Rift. It has seen a real estate boom with growth rates of nearly 8%, double the national average and the ever-changing skyline shows athletes’ continued investment in the city’s commercial real estate. It seems that the contribution of athletes to the Kenyan economy cannot be ignored.

It is therefore evident that if we increase the brand value of our athletes by investing in improving their communication skills, the country will earn more dividends due to their increased income. But even as the government invests in communication skills training for athletes, the Ministry of Sports must also work on other aspects like negotiating tax exemptions on winning fees, appearance fees and endorsements with countries where athletes compete, as is already the case with stars like Usain. Bolt which only competes in countries like the UK when the government offers tax exemptions.

North Rift County governments must also consciously invest in the communication skills of young, aspiring athletes who practice and reside at the many training camps in the area. By improving the communication skills of young athletes before they are introduced to the world stage, county governments can be sure that their investment will pay dividends in the future. To realize this reality, county assemblies could pass legislation that allocates a training budget to athletes while they reside in training camps.

And finally, the corporate sector with companies in the financial sector, the Nairobi Stock Exchange, insurance, construction and luxury car retailers should all invest in training the communication skills of elite athletes. They are directly involved in financial management or athlete participation. They stand to gain when athletes are finally able to earn more money through their improved communication skills.

As a speech coach and communication consultant who has worked periodically with athletes, I recommend two ways to conduct communication skills training.

Training seminars or workshops could be integrated with other regular programs in residential camps for young aspiring athletes and for professional athletes, a month-long one-on-one vocal coaching program that will train them on aspects such as mastering interview techniques, good diction for English presentations, dealing with nervousness among other topics will suffice.

Even as we convey our congratulations and express our pride in our athletes who have dominated the 2022 International Marathon Circuit, it is clearly in our national interest to invest in the communication skills of our greatest ambassadors. It is now!

Mr. Paul Achar is Managing Director and Senior Communication Coach at Jade Communication Limited

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American Sign Language as a first language for toddlers https://eartdocuments.com/american-sign-language-as-a-first-language-for-toddlers/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/american-sign-language-as-a-first-language-for-toddlers/ CARY, NC — What if you could talk to your kids before they start talking? The learning experience has made American Sign Language a key part of educational materials for children in the early stages of life. What do you want to know Cary’s Learning Experience daycare adopts American Sign Language as a way to […]]]>

CARY, NC — What if you could talk to your kids before they start talking?

The learning experience has made American Sign Language a key part of educational materials for children in the early stages of life.

What do you want to know

  • Cary’s Learning Experience daycare adopts American Sign Language as a way to communicate with children who don’t speak enough
  • Teachers incorporate ASL into daily classroom activities
  • Toddlers learn to sign before they speak
  • Shannon Bushway, 28, has been teaching at TLE since 2018
  • The cost of participation may not be affordable for everyone

The child care development franchise has locations across the country.

Nursery director Cary said infants and toddlers using their hands is a natural form of early communication.

“Especially with young children, the most important thing is their communication. Communication is the key to their learning. If they can communicate with the children, it can be much easier for the teacher to know what they want and for the child to know what they need,” Dia Shah said.

Shah has run the establishment for 14 years.

“To be able to talk and interact with adults and, of course, there are infants who don’t have their words yet. We can teach them a sign language to give them a foundation of language,” Shah said.

Excitement is part of every school day. According to one instructor, working with toddlers can be like teaching a moving target.

“For the most part, I always try to use my words with the sign so they can use the audio with the hand gestures,” Shannon Bushway said.

Bushway beckoned to a rowdy class of students whose names they can’t say. Every child cross-legged on the floor or standing with a block in their hand growls most of the time if they try to speak. She continually practices different signs with the little ones. The teacher touched her chin with her outstretched fingers to show “thank you”.

The 28-year-old pointed to an open container filled with oversized Legos. “Put it in the bucket. Help clean up. Thank you,” she gestured as they followed her lead.

Information is like glue if you can get their attention. Most children are between 14 and 20 months old and can’t speak with words, but these little ones cling to everything…literally.

Bushway said signing with them sticks in their brains more than you might think.

“It’s great to help them communicate when they’re so little,” the teacher said.

This is why non-verbal communication is part of the program.

Bushway has worked in early childhood education since 2018. The teacher said their approach to education matches the needs of their mobile student population.

“Look at the sign for the cow,” Bushway said as he read a book to the class.

Story time is a daily classroom assignment, as is singing.

“Babies on the bus go wah wah wah, wah wah wah,” the instructor sang to his students. “Wheels on the Bus” still seems like a useful children’s tune in 2022.

Ironically, a baby’s actions can speak louder than words. When Bushway raised his finger to calm the class, so did two of his students. Some expressions do not need to be pronounced,

“[Sign language] is a great way for them to communicate and learn when we know they are taking in information that they may not yet be able to communicate verbally. Being able to sign is so important,” Bushway said.

Bushway understands what it’s like to reach young people. The educator has a 5-year-old son and entered the Massachusetts child care field at another TLE center four years ago.

The mother came home every day after work to practice signing with her little boy.

When they moved to North Carolina, she began to speak fluently. “I continued my education in sign language with my children. While they were learning, I was also learning,” Bushway said.

Children are in a constant state of engagement with themselves, their classmates, inanimate objects and adults, so the program is designed to transform the world they live in into a classroom.

The small student/teacher ratio allows for individual instruction. Bushways said at this age they are still learning to regulate and process their emotions.

“I feel like sometimes they have all these choices to make and they really know what they want, but sometimes they just need a little help to reach their end goal without too many feelings. “Bushway said.

By discovering the space that surrounds them, they can discover themselves. Bushway said the development of strong cognitive, social and motor skills only happens if the child feels comfortable in their environment.

“I just try to work with them individually and help them regulate their emotions to achieve whatever they’re trying to do,” Bushway said.

Whether it’s choosing a color to draw on paper or finding the right cup to drink your milk.

This innovative style of education does not come cheap, however. The director said the family of preschoolers can pay $1,000 a month.

Parents of babies can pay up to $1,300 per month.

Shah said grants are available for children who cannot afford school fees.

Because you can’t teach who you can’t reach.

This program aims to transform the world they live in in the classroom.

Children are in a constant state of engagement with themselves, their classmates, inanimate objects, and adults.

The small student/teacher ratio allows for individual instruction. Bushways said that at this age they are still learning to regulate and process their emotions.

“I feel like sometimes they have all these choices to make and they really know what they want, but sometimes they just need a little help to get to their end goal without too many feelings,” Bushway said.

By discovering the space around them, they can discover themselves. Bushway said the development of strong cognitive, social and motor skills only happens if the child feels comfortable in their environment.

“I just try to work with them individually and help them regulate their emotions to achieve whatever they’re trying to do,” Bushway said.

Whether it’s choosing a color to draw on paper or finding the right cup to drink your milk from.

This innovative style of education does not come cheap. The director said the family of preschoolers can pay $1,000 a month.

Parents of babies can pay up to $1,300 per month.

Shah said grants are available for children who cannot afford school fees.

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Do you know the dangers of technology? https://eartdocuments.com/do-you-know-the-dangers-of-technology/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 17:55:45 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/do-you-know-the-dangers-of-technology/ In modern society, we seem to be constantly bombarded with technology. Whether we are at home, at work or at school, there is always a technological device nearby. It’s safe to say that almost everything we do in our daily lives involves some kind of technology; from using smartphone apps and social networking sites to […]]]>

In modern society, we seem to be constantly bombarded with technology. Whether we are at home, at work or at school, there is always a technological device nearby. It’s safe to say that almost everything we do in our daily lives involves some kind of technology; from using smartphone apps and social networking sites to playing video games and watching television.

Although often claimed to make life easier, new technologies can have long-term negative consequences. In this article, we will look at some of the possible dangers of being constantly connected to technology. Keep reading to find out more!

Excessive use of technology can have negative health effects

Today, we use technology for many reasons, including work and pleasure. It is used for commercial, personal and social purposes. We use it in our business and pleasure. While there are some benefits to relying so heavily on technology, research has shown that excessive screen time can lead to a host of health issues ranging from eye strain to sleep deprivation.

You may be suffering from digital eye strain if you experience headaches, dry eyes, or neck or shoulder discomfort after staring at screens for long periods of time. This is because staring at screens makes us blink less frequently, leading to dry eyes.

Additionally, staring at screens for too long can lead to computer vision syndrome. When people spend a lot of time staring at digital screens, they can develop eye discomfort and other vision problems.

There are some things we can do to help reduce the negative effects of screens on our eyes, such as: taking frequent breaks, using artificial tears and blinking more often, and wearing computer glasses that have blue light blocking lenses.

Regular eye exams are essential to detect any vision problems early. We can take steps to preserve our eyesight by limiting screen time and taking precautions.

It can also lead to social isolation and a lack of communication skills.

Today, we often prioritize technology over human interaction. We’d rather text or post on social media than talk to someone face-to-face. While it may not seem harmful, too much screen time can actually lead to some pretty serious issues.

When there is too much electronic communication, people isolate themselves. We start to feel removed from the world when we use screens instead of real human interaction. We don’t learn to read body language or recognize non-verbal cues, which makes it difficult for us to connect with others in person. Even when we are around other people, it causes feelings of loneliness and isolation.

If we rely too heavily on technology, we risk losing the ability to communicate verbally. We may become less able to hold a conversation without practice. This is particularly concerning because communication skills are so important in the business world.

Use of digital media impacts children and young adults

We all understand the importance of using media and technology in our lives. We use it to have fun and chat with friends, but few people know how fundamental it is for young people.

According to experts, excessive screen time has been linked to a variety of psychological and physical problems, including developmental delays in the brain, sleep disturbances and mental health problems. According to a study published in JAMA Pediatrics, young people who spend more than two hours on screens are more likely to have attention difficulties.

As parents, we need to monitor screen time for our children. Spending too much time on screens can actually lead to changes in the structure of the brain’s white matter, which then affects a child’s ability to learn, problem solve, and process information. We must act now and limit our children’s access to screens as much as possible.

By setting screen time limits, ensuring they get enough exercise, and providing opportunities for creative play, we can help ensure that our children develop health and happiness.

Children who grow up using too much technology may have trouble concentrating in school and paying attention

It’s no surprise that today’s kids are growing up in a technology-saturated world. With all the advances in recent years, there are more ways than ever to stay connected and entertained, from cell phones and tablets to video games and PCs.

Children are also more likely to experience speech difficulties due to frequent exposure to digital technology. Although this can be beneficial, it can also lead to problems with attention and concentration. According to some research, excessive screen time can lead to attention deficits in school and difficulty completing homework.

Children who are excessively exposed to technology may have difficulty interacting with others and making friends. Parents need to keep an eye on their children’s screen time to avoid these ramifications. In doing so, parents help ensure the academic performance of their children.

It can be addictive and lead to unhealthy lifestyle choices

In today’s fast-paced society, it’s no surprise that technology has begun to dominate our lives. For the most part, technology is there for us – we can chat with our loved ones using our phones or rely on laptops for our work activities.

Although there are several advantages to staying connected, we must also be aware of the disadvantages. For example, addiction due to overconsumption is real and leads to a number of harmful consequences such as anxiety or depression.

The digital world can cause us to lose touch with the people and things that are most important in our lives, which can lead to poor life choices. If we’re not careful, technology can take over our lives, making us feel lonely, nervous and discouraged.

Gambling is an exciting pastime enjoyed by millions of people around the world. Due to the rise of new technologies such as HotSlots LIVE CASINO, it can be more difficult to find a responsible gambling strategy. It is essential to maintain a responsible gambling regime in this situation so that you do not lose all your money to addiction. Remember that going to the casino is about having fun, not making big profits.

Although there are many technological advantages, we must be careful about the time we spend on it, because too many things are not healthy. Let’s use technology in moderation to improve our lives rather than allowing it to control us.

Technology can distract us and prevent us from enjoying the moment

In today’s world, it’s all too easy to fall into the trap of being constantly connected to our digital devices. We are always supplied with the latest and greatest technology, in addition to being bombarded with notifications and updates. It can be difficult to disconnect and enjoy the moment because of this constant flow of information.

While we should pay attention to what’s going on around us, we spend way too much time online and on social media sites. Even if we don’t currently use our electronic devices, they can keep us captivated. To break this distracting cycle, we need to make a conscious decision to forego technology-free activities.

Whether you want to take a digital detox vacation or disconnect for an hour each day, making an effort to disconnect will help you appreciate what more you have.

What can we do to stay in touch with the important things in life?

Every day seems to bring a new article about how technology is changing the world. We hear about how artificial intelligence will replace human jobs, how we are becoming more alone through the consumption of digital media, and how our attention spans are shortening.

It’s easy to become paranoid about the potential dangers of technology to our civilization. But we can take steps to stay connected to what matters in life. We could reduce the time we spend staring at a screen and spend more time on real-world experiences. Second, when the opportunity arises, we need to turn off our devices and enjoy nature.

Conclusion

We need to carefully consider the negative effects of our planet’s reliance on technology. Although there are several advantages to using technology, we should also be aware of some potential dangers. With the constant use of media and technology, it is essential that we take steps to protect ourselves from possible health risks by incorporating moderation into our daily routine and making time for breaks.

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Duolingo launches hyper-localized language campaign https://eartdocuments.com/duolingo-launches-hyper-localized-language-campaign/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 04:11:17 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/duolingo-launches-hyper-localized-language-campaign/ Digitas India has successfully concluded an integrated advertising campaign for Duolingo, the most popular language learning app in the world, which allows users to learn from over 100 courses in over 40 languages ​​in India. The hyper-localized campaign that was staged for Bengali-speaking markets, with a particular focus on Kolkata, resulted in positive business results […]]]>

Digitas India has successfully concluded an integrated advertising campaign for Duolingo, the most popular language learning app in the world, which allows users to learn from over 100 courses in over 40 languages ​​in India. The hyper-localized campaign that was staged for Bengali-speaking markets, with a particular focus on Kolkata, resulted in positive business results for the brand.

Bengali is the second most spoken language in India and the seventh in the world. With the launch of the Bengali to English course, Duolingo has made this fun learning tool available to over 300 million Bengali speakers worldwide, including those in India and Bangladesh.

As there was a growing need and demand from the Bengali speaking audience in India for an effective English language course, it was imperative to build a narrative based on an understanding of the cultural nuances of the market. It had to be personalized and presented in a way that resonated deeply with local audiences.

The central narrative was therefore based on the fact that if one understands a complex and complicated language like Bengali, understanding English becomes so much easier! This led to the rise of the phrase Ankhon Bangla Jaanle Engriji Eiji which translates to “If you know Bengali, then learning English is easy”. Incorporating information based on daily behaviors and lifestyles in Bengali-speaking markets, the advertisements integrated humor, food, relationships, traffic and festivities into the main content. The campaign was also designed to accurately represent Duolingo’s core principles of being fun, free, and effective.

Commenting on the ad campaign, Karan Kapany, Country Head, Duolingo said: “Indians are largely multilingual and are constantly adding new language skills to their repertoire. While English can often be seen as an intimidating language to learn, many fail to realize that local Indian languages ​​are far more nuanced and complex, making learning English easier in comparison.

“While we wanted to encourage Bengali speakers across India and Bangladesh to add English to their language portfolio, it was important to tailor communication in a way that was extremely relevant, localized and engaging. We were successful to do so effectively and have seen phenomenal growth in Bengali-speaking cities and audiences. India is one of the fastest growing markets for Duolingo and with the successful launch of Bengali, we see great potential for introduce even more regional languages ​​in the future,” he added further.

The linguistic launch campaign was deployed on media often frequented by the Bengali-speaking public. Radio jingles composed by the famous Surojit Chatterjee and sung by the incredibly talented Ananya Chakraborty on popular radio stations in West Bengal, OOH in major cities of West Bengal, Metro takeover in Kolkata, branded candy boxes and digital movies on social media and YouTube – the rollout of the targeted 360 degree campaign has proven to be very effective.

Achieving the business goal it set itself, the campaign effortlessly propelled the Bengali to English course to second place in India in just a week of deployment, moving it up several rungs on the ladder. popularity of the language in India. The app saw a whopping 400% increase in active users after the launch of the campaign, with Kolkata becoming the 3rd largest Duolingo user market in India.

Sharing her perspective on the campaign and its success, Sonia Khurana, COO of Digitas India, said: “We believe it was the simplicity of the idea behind the idea, along with the conscious and impeccable execution that made this campaign a huge success. More so, the team had a ton of fun bringing this to life to this idea – it’s campaigns like this that are worth it!”

Digitas India won the digital AOR for Duolingo India earlier this year and was responsible for cross-channel strategy, and integrated campaigns.

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EU digitization will fail without CE’s emerging tech talent https://eartdocuments.com/eu-digitization-will-fail-without-ces-emerging-tech-talent/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 14:02:28 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/eu-digitization-will-fail-without-ces-emerging-tech-talent/ Jozsef Boda, CEO of cool code and Michał Mysiak, CEO of Software Development Academy examine the EU’s Digital Decade initiative against the backdrop of the economic downturn and discuss why focusing on Central European talent could be the smart solution to the growing tech skills shortage. We are in the EU digital decade, this is […]]]>

CEO of Software Development Academy

Jozsef Boda, CEO of cool code and Michał Mysiak, CEO of Software Development Academy examine the EU’s Digital Decade initiative against the backdrop of the economic downturn and discuss why focusing on Central European talent could be the smart solution to the growing tech skills shortage.

We are in the EU digital decade, this is an initiative to achieve a “successful digital transformation of the European Union by 2030” and “essential to achieve the transition to a climate-neutral economy, circular and resilient”.. Launched in 2021, the initiative perhaps recognizes that much of Europe’s tech sector is underperforming compared to the global market and there is still much to do.

The goals of the digital decade are ambitious, and the fallout from the conflict in Ukraine and the growing energy crisis will only make them harder to achieve. The plans cover four ‘cornerstones’ on a digital compass to show the way towards achieving its digital decade goals: develop secure and sustainable digital infrastructures, establish the digitization of public services, the digital transformation of companies and the development of digital skills. The last of these, ‘skills’, is critical and underpins the others – without enough people with the right skills, it will be next to impossible to build the necessary infrastructure or change the way organizations operate.

But there is a problem in terms of skills – a Europe-wide shortage of developers, testers and cybersecurity professionals. The experience of the software development manager, Istvan Hilgert of the Swedish company Accedo, is typical, ‘Over the past 6 months, I would say the situation has become quite dramatic. I would even say, tragic. It is becoming more and more difficult to find highly qualified and experienced developers.

The number of hard-to-fill positions is increasing and the growing global demand for technology-enabled skills will only make the demand for these people greater. So how will the Digital Decade be supported? Where will the people with the technical skills and experience to deliver Europe’s digital transformation come from?

One of the objectives of the Digital Decade program is to employ 20 million ICT specialists by 2030, equally divided between men and women. This is the kind of growth that will be needed and Ursula von der Leyen’s (President of the European Commission) proposal to make 2023 the “European Year of Skills” in her 2022 State of the Union address could help give momentum to the digital decade. However, as von der Leyen said in his speech, unemployment is at an all time high, while job vacancies are at an all time high. More people need to develop computer skills to make this all work.

A common solution to address the lack of resources, especially IT, has been to outsource work and destinations. The Indian subcontinent, for example, has been a popular outsourcing location for US and UK companies and perhaps, to a lesser extent, for continental Europe. However, sending work to remote locations outside the region seems to go against both the spirit and the objectives of the digital decade when there is enough “raw material” available much closer from home in the European region to meet their IT needs.

The “raw material” that can drive the Digital Decade will come from Central Europe – these countries are already showing rapid growth in digital capability and still have a lot of growth in this area ahead of them. These challenger digital economies, as McKinsey calls themhave experienced strong growth in the value of the IT sector within their economies, comparable to growth in more mature digital markets such as the UK, Sweden and the Netherlands. What’s more, this growth has come at a time when the proportion of their population engaged in IT is still far behind these countries – there is clearly room for growth in the Central European IT sector.

Is the growth of the IT sector in Central Europe sustainable? will the underlying drivers continue to fuel this growth in the digital decade? We believe the answer is an emphatic yes. Some commentators suggest that because Central (and Eastern) European countries emerged from a rigid Soviet system, it actually fostered innovation as people developed a problem-solving mindset in different ways – to circumvent the rigidity of the system. If such a post-Soviet innovation boom was a factor, it might just be a one-time effect rather than something endemic in the mindset of the population. Instead, more mundane considerations are and continue to drive the growth of the IT industry: population, language skills, and the availability of effective IT training.

The population of Central and Eastern Europe tends to be younger than the rest of the region and the cost of living is generally much lower than in Western and Northern Europe. This paves the way for the creation of a relatively large group of motivated young people for whom obtaining well-paying careers in fields such as IT can make a big difference to their economic well-being and their way of life. .

English is effectively the lingua franca of the fields of science, technology and computing and being able to communicate in English certainly makes IT professionals more marketable. In Central and Eastern Europe, the English skills of IT professionals are particularly strong: Poland, for example, 90% of software developers have an intermediate or higher level of English proficiency.

Training will be a key element in achieving the skills component of the digital compass and the people who will drive the digital decade need training to deliver the EU ambition. Although there are many training courses for technical computer skills such as programming through Europethere are relatively few IT trainings that also provide the soft skills that help individuals succeed in the workplace.

These soft skills, such as effective collaboration, time management and good communication skills, combined with strong technical skills are, according to the World Economic Forumthe types of skills that are and will be in demand in the years to come. In Central Europe, innovative approaches to IT skills development that integrate soft skills training into the process of becoming an IT professional will help make its employees a driving force in the digital decade.

Despite a troubled outlook for the European economy, the Digital Decade promises to be an interesting time and, with the skills and knowledge of Central European digital professionals, it could well be successful.

About Codecool and the Software Development Academy

cool code and Software Development Academy (SDA) recently merged to become a European digital skills and sourcing powerhouse. With a presence in eight countries, the new organization aims to train 15,000 to 20,000 people a year in IT skills and work with more than 400 partner companies to provide a workforce trained in the most popular technology topics, from coding, security to the Internet of Things and more. .

References

  1. Towards the digital decade, Eur-Lex
  2. Securing Europe’s Competitiveness: Closing the Technological Gap, McKinsey
  3. Numerical goals for 2030THIS
  4. Accedo, Software Development Manager, Istvan Hilgertcool code
  5. ICT specialists – hard to fill vacanciesEurostat
  6. Future of Jobs Reportthe World Economic Forum
  7. State of the Union 2022 address by President von der LeyenEU
  8. The Rise of Digital ChallengersMcKinsey
  9. ICT specialists in employmentEurostat
  10. How did Central and Eastern Europe become a technological hotbed?Investment Monitor
  11. An aging Europe – statistics on population changeEurostat
  12. Software companies in Poland: 2022 outsourcing guide for CTOs
  13. Draft Needs Analysis Report I Most Needed Software Roles and Skills in EuropeESSA
  14. Future of Jobs Reportthe World Economic Forum
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