Language skills – Eart Documents http://eartdocuments.com/ Tue, 20 Jul 2021 14:23:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://eartdocuments.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-07-01T001347.882.png Language skills – Eart Documents http://eartdocuments.com/ 32 32 International Leadership of Texas prepares students for success through multilingual education https://eartdocuments.com/international-leadership-of-texas-prepares-students-for-success-through-multilingual-education/ https://eartdocuments.com/international-leadership-of-texas-prepares-students-for-success-through-multilingual-education/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 14:18:23 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/international-leadership-of-texas-prepares-students-for-success-through-multilingual-education/ As a parent, you want to do whatever you can to ensure your child’s future success – and a valuable option is to expose them to multilingual education. Knowing a second or third language is not only beneficial for your child’s communication skills, but is becoming more and more necessary in our increasingly interconnected world. […]]]>

As a parent, you want to do whatever you can to ensure your child’s future success – and a valuable option is to expose them to multilingual education. Knowing a second or third language is not only beneficial for your child’s communication skills, but is becoming more and more necessary in our increasingly interconnected world.

International Leadership of Texas (ILTexas), the charter school system that operates 20 campuses in North and Central Texas, recognizes the importance of a multilingual environment and offers instruction in English, Spanish and Mandarin as part of of its program. Texas is a powerful economic force in the world and its top three exporting countries are Mexico, Canada and China. By teaching from a global perspective, all students can graduate from ILTexas with the tools necessary for future leadership and success in the international world.

Boosts the brain

Some parents may fear that their child is too young to be exposed to a second language, especially if their mother tongue is not fully developed. However, many studies have established that when it comes to languages, infants and young children are superior learners compared to adults, meaning that the more they start to learn, the better. By the time typical high school language classes begin, the brain has already settled into its way of forming thoughts in one language, so it can be extremely difficult to grasp the structure of a second language.

Research also shows that learning more than one language stimulates problem solving, critical thinking and listening skills, as well as improved memory, concentration and the ability to multitask. at a time. Children fluent in other languages ​​also show signs of increased creativity and mental flexibility.

Additionally, children who are exposed to a second language in their early years tend to have a more natural accent, similar to the mother tongue, when speaking that language. Children constantly imitate what they hear and are particularly sensitive to differences in sound and tone. Their ears often pick up and reproduce the delicate sounds that adults and even teenagers often stumble upon. A second language study will help your child to express himself easily and with confidence.

Teaches empathy and tolerance and promotes more effective communication in adulthood

Studying a language involves more than learning new words and grammar rules. It is also a gateway to another culture and another way of life. Multilingual education gives children a broader perspective and brings them closer to other nationalities and races.

In a rapidly changing world, effective communication becomes extremely important. Children who are able to understand diverse cultures and perspectives are more likely to become open-minded and accept differences.

Improves career opportunities

When your child begins a career as a young adult, being fluent in more than one language can help them stand out from their peers. In today’s global economy, many international companies are looking for multilingual people. An education that encompasses the study of more than one language can help give your child a unique advantage over their future competitors in the workforce.

Provides leadership preparation in a globalized world

Thanks to technology, communications and rapid international travel, the world is more connected than ever. Providing your child with a multilingual education gives them the best chance to succeed in a globalized future. From improving cognitive functioning and communication skills to open-mindedness and tolerance, they will be better prepared to become leaders of the 21st century.

Learn more about Texas international leadership

Dr Laura Carrasco-Navarrete, Deputy Superintendent of Studies and Student Services for ILTexas, says the charter school’s language studies go hand in hand with its overall mission.

“Our graduates stand out in the university admission process not only because of their multilingual education, but also because of the service leadership skills they have acquired at ILTexas – putting others before themselves. », Explains Carrasco-Navarrete. “We encourage everyone to come to one of our campuses, get to know our students, and see for yourself why our future is bright in the hands of these future world leaders. “

All ILTexas campuses will be open for in-person classes for the fall 2021 term, with appropriate security protocols in place. To submit an application for your child, visit iltexas.org.


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How to grow your business across diverse cultures https://eartdocuments.com/how-to-grow-your-business-across-diverse-cultures/ https://eartdocuments.com/how-to-grow-your-business-across-diverse-cultures/#respond Fri, 16 Jul 2021 04:00:29 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/how-to-grow-your-business-across-diverse-cultures/ # 1: Prepare to approach the carriers. To successfully serve diverse communities, one must first establish partnerships with appropriate carriers. Think about the process and think of it as a marriage – you are together for the long haul, so being picky about choosing carriers is essential. Research the demographics of the area and write […]]]>

# 1: Prepare to approach the carriers.

To successfully serve diverse communities, one must first establish partnerships with appropriate carriers. Think about the process and think of it as a marriage – you are together for the long haul, so being picky about choosing carriers is essential. Research the demographics of the area and write a plan that shows how the market you will be serving can help the carrier profit from it. Most importantly, look for carriers that match the authenticity of your agency.
(Photo: © Blue Planet Studio / Adobe Stock)

# 2: Ask the right questions.

Don’t go to a carrier meeting without a list of questions to ask. Ask each company the same questions for a better comparison when making your final decisions about which carriers to partner with. Here are some helpful questions to include:
What types of training do you offer to agencies?
What is the process for doing business with you?
How? ‘Or’ What is it easy to do business with you?
What is your turnaround time on policies, quotes and endorsements?
What what does compensation look like?
If we grow up, Is there any profit sharing?
What niches do you serve?
Are you engaged in our territory?
Do you do you have a multilingual / diverse team to support diversity efforts?
(Photo: Roberto Jiménez / ALM, Shutterstock.com)

N ° 3: Build networks.

Active networking is essential for continued growth, and the insurance industry is full of people who love to help each other. Start your network of insurance peers by getting involved with national and local associations, including Professional Insurance Agents (PIAs) and Insurance Agents and Brokers (IA&B). From there, look for opportunities with national associations including the American Insurance Marketing & Sales Society (AIMS), AUGIE Group, and tech user groups like NetVu or the Applied Client Network. The more connections you have in the industry, the more likely you are to find someone else facing the same challenges or obstacles to growth. Connect and learn from your network.
(Photo: PopTika / Shutterstock)

# 4: Be a student.

Knowledge is power, and this is especially true in insurance. Invest in yourself and your agency through education and designations – two things no one can take away from you. In addition to insurance education, we also recommend niche education. If you want to serve a particular industry or community, take the time to learn as much as you can about them. No one likes to buy from a used car dealer, so let your knowledge and experience show you the way to be genuine yourself when communicating.
(Photo: Mediteraneo / Adobe Stock)

No. 5: Understand customer expectations.

When was the last time you asked customers what they expected from their insurance agent? Knowing the preferred communication methods, how often they want to hear from you, and what is most important in the insurance transaction sets you apart from other agencies. Also, recognize and take into account the cultural differences between the various communities you seek to attract and serve. Once you know what customers expect, work with your team to implement procedures and processes that meet or exceed those expectations and deliver the ‘mind blowing factor’.
(Photo: nhlsft / Shutterstock)

# 6: hire the right team.

The more diverse your team, the more successful your agency will be in attracting and serving a diverse community or niche market. It is beneficial to have multilingual staff who can communicate with customers in their native language. Find out which languages ​​are used the most in your community or niche by doing market research. Then recruit team members who have cultural knowledge and those valuable language skills.
(Photo: digitalskillet1 / Adobe Stock)

# 7: build relationships.

As it is important to network with peers, it is also essential to build relationships in your community. Attend community events and empower team members to do the same. The more your brand is represented and recognized, the more ideal clients will find and trust your agency to help them with their insurance needs.
(Photo: freshidea / Adobe Stock)

N ° 8: Invest in the community.

How involved are you in the community now? Clients want to see that their investment in your agency will be reintegrated into their community. Sponsor local events, donate to schools, partner with other businesses in the area for giveaways, and show that you are investing in their livelihoods and caring for their well-being.
(Photo: VectorMine / Shutterstock.com)

It’s no surprise that diversity was a growing topic in the United States last year, with 76% of organizations stating it as a stated value, according to the PwC Global Diversity and Inclusion Survey. As the nation diversifies, insurance agencies should identify ways to best serve intercultural communities.

Agencies that understand the importance of serving diverse communities will experience growth if they plan an outreach strategy wisely and intentionally make decisions and changes. Whether you’re already taking action or just starting the process, the eight ideas presented above can help you grow your agency in diverse cultures.

Growing up while serving diverse cultures is new to many agencies. Remember to start small, keep an open mind, and stay genuine with yourself and your agency.

Serving diverse cultures and communities is an important topic and conversation insurance agents need to have to continue growing in 2021 and beyond. The American Insurance Marketing & Sales Society (GOALS) and Chartered Professional Insurance Agent (CPIA) seminars encourage these types of useful discussions so members can learn from each other. The AIMS Society offers programs and services that help insurance agents develop their marketing and sales expertise. To learn more about the AIMS Society, visit www.aimssociety.org.

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At the start of the pandemic, a farm laborer’s days in the fields continued as usual. Then she became a community health worker, using her trilingual language skills to help immunize more people. | Cover collections https://eartdocuments.com/at-the-start-of-the-pandemic-a-farm-laborers-days-in-the-fields-continued-as-usual-then-she-became-a-community-health-worker-using-her-trilingual-language-skills-to-help-immunize-more-people/ https://eartdocuments.com/at-the-start-of-the-pandemic-a-farm-laborers-days-in-the-fields-continued-as-usual-then-she-became-a-community-health-worker-using-her-trilingual-language-skills-to-help-immunize-more-people/#respond Fri, 02 Jul 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/at-the-start-of-the-pandemic-a-farm-laborers-days-in-the-fields-continued-as-usual-then-she-became-a-community-health-worker-using-her-trilingual-language-skills-to-help-immunize-more-people/ FOR MARCIANA LAZARO, WORK DURING COVID WAS A LOT LIKE WORK AT ANY OTHER TIME. During harvest season, she would start her days at 3 a.m. to make lunch and get ready for her day, then wait for a ride (she can’t drive) and get to an eight-hour shift in the streets. fields, usually six […]]]>

FOR MARCIANA LAZARO, WORK DURING COVID WAS A LOT LIKE WORK AT ANY OTHER TIME. During harvest season, she would start her days at 3 a.m. to make lunch and get ready for her day, then wait for a ride (she can’t drive) and get to an eight-hour shift in the streets. fields, usually six days a day. week. She adds that it was difficult to maintain six feet of distance between workers except during lunch.

She is not surprised that information about Covid-19 and resources may have been slower to penetrate the farm worker community, as often farm workers are too tired or too focused on day-to-day survival to tap into a additional awareness.

But starting in January, Lazaro left the fields and became an outreach worker herself, employed as a community health worker on the Monterey County VIDA project, designed to help vulnerable residents navigate resources. of Covid-19 such as testing, paid sick leave and, most recently, vaccines. One recent afternoon, she and two fellow farmers sat at a table in Greenfield handing out flyers about local programs.

Lazaro, a small woman with a shy smile, says promoting vaccinations is one of her main topics of conversation these days. “I encourage them to get vaccinated because there are a lot of them who don’t want to be vaccinated,” she says. Some cite fears of developing more serious illness from the vaccine (unfounded fears, which Lazaro discusses with them) or of developing flu-like symptoms and missing work.

Lazaro tells them they can get additional sick leave if they show up for a Covid-19 vaccine appointment or show symptoms after receiving the vaccine – all regardless of immigration status . “I tell them not to be afraid because even if we don’t have papers, we have rights,” she says.

Lazaro is also an immigrant. She moved with her husband from Oaxaca, Mexico, to Greenfield in 2003 in search of a better life. Back in their hometown, they barely earned enough money to eat. They have three sons – Ulises, 16, Egu, 11, and Santiago Jr., 2. His eldest son is deaf and Lazaro has learned sign language to communicate with him.

It is his third language, in addition to his native Mixtec and Spanish. “It’s easier to talk to my fellow citizens who speak Mixtec,” she said.

While her goal in Project VIDA is to communicate with the thousands of native Mexican residents of Monterey County, some of whom do not speak Spanish or speak Spanish as a second language, her fluency in sign language has also been helpful. Once, while in Mee Memorial Hospital for a Johnson & Johnson vaccination clinic, a deaf couple showed up hoping to receive their second dose of the Pfizer vaccine. She motioned to them to let them know that they were in the wrong clinic and sent them to the right place.

Audelia Garcia Cervantes, chair of the board of directors of Lideres Campesinas, says having native language speakers like Lazaro in their organization and in county programs helps them reach more people among the farm worker community. . “They help us build trust,” says Cervantes. “It’s an achievement to have it [Lazaro] in our group.


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These old programming languages ​​are still essential for large companies. But nobody wants to learn them https://eartdocuments.com/these-old-programming-languages-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bare-still-essential-for-large-companies-but-nobody-wants-to-learn-them/ https://eartdocuments.com/these-old-programming-languages-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bare-still-essential-for-large-companies-but-nobody-wants-to-learn-them/#respond Wed, 30 Jun 2021 16:00:29 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/these-old-programming-languages-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bare-still-essential-for-large-companies-but-nobody-wants-to-learn-them/ Large organizations still rely on aging computer systems and programming languages ​​to run their mainframes. But as developers reach retirement age, new developers are reluctant to take back their old skills. Large organizations still rely heavily on legacy mainframes gorodenkoff, Getty Images / iStockphoto Large organizations that depend on legacy IT systems face an urgent […]]]>

Large organizations still rely on aging computer systems and programming languages ​​to run their mainframes. But as developers reach retirement age, new developers are reluctant to take back their old skills.

Large organizations still rely heavily on legacy mainframes

gorodenkoff, Getty Images / iStockphoto

Large organizations that depend on legacy IT systems face an urgent skills shortage as older developers pull out of the workforce – and take their expertise with them.

An Advanced Software report suggests that nearly 9 in 10 large organizations (89%) are concerned about a shortage of IT staff with the skills to maintain and manage their existing IT systems.

These systems are generally supported by programming languages ​​such as COBOL, a programming language designed in 1959 and yet still widely used by large organizations to process data from important central systems such as invoicing, accounts, payroll and accounts. customer transactions.

Must-read developer content

Tim Jones, general manager of EMEA Application Modernization at Advanced, said developers who understand procedural languages ​​like COBOL are increasingly difficult to find, in large part because they are gradually retiring.

“To make matters worse, most
universities no longer offer mainframe teaching courses

since no one would dream of using procedural languages ​​like COBOL for entirely new development projects, ”Jones told TechRepublic.

“For some, it’s hard to understand why organizations continue to use such old technology for their mission-critical applications, especially when we live in an era of accelerated change. The reason is quite simple: the existing systems are stable and robust. They are functioning satisfactorily. and continue to meet the functional demands around which they were originally built. ”

SEE: The Best Programming Languages ​​To Learn – And The Worst (TechRepublic Premium)

According to a 2018 Forrester Consulting study, companies have lost an average of 23% of their specialist staff on mainframe over the past five years, with 63% of these positions remaining vacant.

Three-quarters of the 400 organizations surveyed by Advanced said COBOL remains the most important language in their mainframe fleet.

Although COBOL is the most common language, a typical mainframe park will often contain a combination of language types, from CA Gen and CA Telon to Assembler, Natural and PL1.

The assembly language or “assembler” is still used by 66% of large companies, Advanced found, along with other important languages, notably ADS / Online (40%), CA Gen (37%), CA Telon (24%) and PL / 1 (15%).

These are the languages ​​that put businesses at greatest risk, Jones said. “The talent pool for developers of these languages ​​is shrinking at the same rate as COBOL’s, but it is considerably smaller; COBOL remains the most universally supported and understood procedural language in the mainframe arsenal.

“I know of a steel company that spent millions to train a few consultants in Natural because they literally couldn’t find anyone who knew the language other than the system manager on site.”

Demand for developers has been particularly urgent over the past 12 months as businesses have been hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has accelerated IT modernization initiatives and shone the spotlight on obsolete systems that continue to grow. feed huge government and organizational databases.

In April 2020, hundreds of thousands of residents submitted claims to the New Jersey state unemployment system, resulting in a 1,600% increase in claims that
quickly overwhelmed its COBOL-based mainframe

and resulted in a plea for COBOL programmers from state governor Phil Murphy.

The US Treasury Department’s Internal Revenue Service (IRS) “System 6,” which hosts taxpayer data, is also written in Assembler and COBOL, Jones said, while Assembler is still commonly used in applications. basic banking because of its proximity to the machine. code, which allows it to quickly execute transaction activities.

A third of organizations surveyed by Advanced said they fear staff will retire and take their legacy skills with them.

The consequences of developers with legacy tech skills leaving the talent pool can be huge, Jones said, especially since it can lead to difficulties in evolving IT to meet new demand or integrating legacy systems. to modern technology.

“The problem is, these systems have passed through many hands over many years, often without proper documentation of features or functional relationships,” Jones said.

“As the technology, infrastructure and architecture of the businesses around them evolve, the retention burden continues to grow. ”

While developers with legacy expertise leave the workforce, new developers are not trained to maintain old systems – and are reluctant to do so.

SEE: The Future of Work: Tools and Strategies for the Digital Workplace (Free PDF) (TechRepublic)

More than a third (36%) of organizations polled by Advanced said they feared people entering the workforce would only have “modern” skills. At the same time, 29% said their staff did not want to acquire legacy skills, while 28% fear losing talent to competitors using more modern technologies such as Java,
Python

and C #, where the demand for application development continues to grow.

Jones said companies risk being “hyper-focused” on recruiting modern skills and ignoring the need for legacy talent, when in fact both are vital.

“It’s important for organizations to cross-train existing talent to improve the ability of their staff to support existing and modern systems, especially during and after major modernization initiatives,” Jones said.

One question that might be asked is why the disappearance of legacy computer skills should be seen as a growing problem; the industry has been talking about it for years after all.

“The reality is that the resource pool has been shrinking for a long time, but now it’s happening at an accelerated rate,” Jones said.

“Consider that the mainframe had its heyday in the 70s, 80s and 90s. It was a time when people were coming out of college and starting their first jobs programming in COBOL. career and on the verge of a well-deserved retirement, but for at least 30 years no new talent has come to replace them. “

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