multilingual – Eart Documents http://eartdocuments.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 02:28:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://eartdocuments.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-07-01T001347.882.png multilingual – Eart Documents http://eartdocuments.com/ 32 32 MLL students share a Thanksgiving meal at Bain Middle School https://eartdocuments.com/mll-students-share-a-thanksgiving-meal-at-bain-middle-school/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:53:42 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/mll-students-share-a-thanksgiving-meal-at-bain-middle-school/ Last June, 14-year-old Steven Carrera moved from Guatemala to the United States when his aunt offered him the opportunity to come live with her and study in America. The teenager had to decide quickly if he would go and quickly flew out, eventually settling in Cranston. Carrera is one of approximately 130 students in grades […]]]>

Last June, 14-year-old Steven Carrera moved from Guatemala to the United States when his aunt offered him the opportunity to come live with her and study in America. The teenager had to decide quickly if he would go and quickly flew out, eventually settling in Cranston.

Carrera is one of approximately 130 students in grades six through eight who participate in the Cranston Public Schools Multilingual Learner (MLL) program housed at Hugh B. Bain Middle School. He and his classmates shared their trips to America as well as stories of what they are grateful for during the MLL program’s Thanksgiving celebration on Nov. 22.

The Thanksgiving celebration began at Park View Middle School when the English as a Second Language (ESL) program – now known as MLL – was housed there. The program eventually moved to Bain Middle School where the celebration has since taken place. The event was led by the school’s Dream Team teachers: Kerri Lapierre, Dino Bachini, Courtney Matarese, Joseph Ceraldi and Christian Whittaker as well as the RI Reds: Sue Dean and Keo Phrathep.

On Tuesday, students and teachers gathered in the auditorium where Superintendent Jeannine Nota-Masse greeted everyone, followed by Principal Keith Croft who said a few words. After the welcome portion of the program, 23 students walked across the stage with flags representing each country that one of Cranston’s current MLL students is from. Christian Solis Cintron and Yadiel Moreno hosted the event followed by students enjoying a Thanksgiving feast. The tables were decorated with yellow and orange tablecloths with festive fall centerpieces.

Lapierre, who is the MLL team leader and English teacher for the program, said the turkeys and dessert were donated by Dig In Dining and Entertainment and Aramark provided side dishes. The turkeys were brought to Cranston High School West for the students to cook, then sent the poultry to Bain Middle School. Lapierre thanked Grace Swinski, parent and family engagement coordinator, for the gift cards that allowed MLL staff to choose more Thanksgiving foods at the market.

This year marks the first time since the pandemic that the Thanksgiving celebration has fully returned. Last year, staff served students nothing but desserts and listened to essays about what they were grateful for and about their trip to America.

One of Lapierre’s favorite parts of the event is reading student essays.

“Until you read those stories, you don’t necessarily realize what’s going on in their family life,” Lapierre said, adding that the stories may tell of challenges or sacrifices they’ve made to come here. .

Many students shared their trip to America; the trip came with mixed feelings of excitement and sadness.

“I was happy because I had a new life and a new education,” said Awa Ceesay, who left The Gambia last May. “I was sad because I was leaving my mother, my grandmother, my brothers and sisters, aunts and uncles who I had been with for twelve years.”

Gabriel Isaias De oleo Morales, 13, was happy to move from the Dominican Republic to America in 2018 as he would see his family who already lived here. He wrote that his family had come to seek a better life and education.

Students referenced some of the differences between their home country and the United States, such as food, vacations, weather, language, and clothing.

“I noticed that school starts at different times of the year because in Guatemala they start in January and in America they start in September,” wrote Angel Carranza, who was born in Guatemala and came to the States. United in 2018. “The food here is way different in terms of flavor and portions.”

Carrera, who has spoken of moving in with her aunt, shared that there are more opportunities for school and work here. He added that he talks to his parents and sister on FaceTime every day.

“I’m happy to be in the United States because I came to learn English and make new friends and enjoy my family that I have in the United States and enjoy my country. And be able to graduate with excellence,” Carrera wrote in her essay.

Nhi Dao, 14, wrote about his life in the city of Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam, and his move to the United States two years ago. Dao had to leave her mother behind, giving her a bouquet of roses to say goodbye. Doa then flew with her father and arrived in California.

“I have hardly seen anything like Vietnam, like the food. There are dishes I have never eaten like takis, tapas, burritos and pretzels,” Dao wrote. Ultimately, my impression of American cuisine was that all the food was too salty and the cakes here were too sweet for me.”

Several students shared how grateful they were for this Thanksgiving.

“One person I’m grateful for is my mother. She’s a very kind woman,” Jeremy Sosa Ortiz wrote.

He added that he was grateful for his home because some people aren’t so lucky.

Yoskar Joaquin Pena shared that he was grateful for his school, friends and family.

“I’m grateful to school for teaching me things I didn’t know before and for teaching me how to speak English,” Pena wrote.

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The Chatham Education Foundation awards 19 creative teaching scholarships https://eartdocuments.com/the-chatham-education-foundation-awards-19-creative-teaching-scholarships/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 18:17:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/the-chatham-education-foundation-awards-19-creative-teaching-scholarships/ ● Integrating Literacy Into Social Studies, by Susana Negroni for second grade bilingual classes at North Chatham Elementary. ● Decodables to Animate Literacy, by Jessy Durizch and Kathleen Hughes for Chatham Grove The funds will be used to purchase decodables to help emerging leaders with the skills they have learned or are currently practicing. ● […]]]>

● Integrating Literacy Into Social Studies, by Susana Negroni for second grade bilingual classes at North Chatham Elementary.

● Decodables to Animate Literacy, by Jessy Durizch and Kathleen Hughes for Chatham Grove The funds will be used to purchase decodables to help emerging leaders with the skills they have learned or are currently practicing.

● Parent Academy – In Spanish, by Rebekah Concepcion, ESL Teachers and World Spanish Teachers for North Chatham Elementary
The school purchases books to create a Spanish Parent Academy to help families navigate the school system and support their students.

● To Be Seen and Heard, by Sarah Jones and Zachary Wills for Silk Hope School, the grant will be used for a Smart TV so that visual and performing arts classes can replace outdated technology.

● Kelso: Choosing Character and Resolving Conflict, by Amy Doty and Leann Munoz for Perry Harrison Elementary School will purchase kits for students to learn character traits and conflict resolution with a digital program called “Kelso’s Choice “, which emphasizes respect, caring, fairness, responsibility and honesty, as well as a conflict management component.

● Social Opportunities for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Students, from Salita Callicutt and CCS Exceptional Children’s Department
The funds will be used to hold quarterly socialization events throughout the district for students who are deaf or hard of hearing and who are typically isolated within their schools. The grant will also be used to support parent initiatives and collaborative efforts.

● Fifth Grade Microscopes, by Susan Hamilton, Sara Knight, Cathay Anstrom and Ed Vihlen for Chatham Grove Elementary
With the purchase of microscopes through the grant, fifth-grade students will have the opportunity to observe pre-made slides of plant and animal cell and tissue samples, as well as create and observe their own slides of dried skin cells, plant cells and others.

● High-interest decodable books for our growing population of multilingual learners, by Juliana Maul for North Chatham Elementary
The school will use the funds to purchase high-interest decodable books for a variety of reading levels for use with multilingual learners.

● Engaging Reading Intervention Material, by Sarah Bonenberger and her teammate Erin Collins for Chatham Grove Elementary
The grant will be used to purchase decodable readers for students and magnetic boards for teaching phonetics.

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Jean Couteau’s essential new volume describes the modern Balinese dilemma – Mon 14 November 2022 https://eartdocuments.com/jean-couteaus-essential-new-volume-describes-the-modern-balinese-dilemma-mon-14-november-2022/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 18:04:03 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/jean-couteaus-essential-new-volume-describes-the-modern-balinese-dilemma-mon-14-november-2022/ Richard Horstman (Jakarta Post) PRIME Denpasar ● Mon 14 November 2022 Bali, 50 years of change: Interview with Jean Couteau by Eric Buvelot examines the transformation of Bali – from a traditional agrarian society to a capitalist service society. This fascinating exchange reveals complex and often paradoxical scenarios. The book is a leap forward in […]]]>

Richard Horstman (Jakarta Post)

PRIME

Denpasar ●
Mon 14 November 2022

Bali, 50 years of change: Interview with Jean Couteau by Eric Buvelot examines the transformation of Bali – from a traditional agrarian society to a capitalist service society. This fascinating exchange reveals complex and often paradoxical scenarios. The book is a leap forward in understanding modern Balinese.

“During the last century, the world has invited itself to Bali and, in doing so, has upset the traditional balance of society”, explains Jean Couteau, a multilingual writer (Indonesian, French, English), specialist in Bali and the columnist for kompa newspaper.

Much of Bali’s transformation has occurred since the 1970s, when the island opened up to tourism. In this book, an edited transcription of 270 pages of 20 hours of interviews granted to Buvelot over seven months, Couteau does not limit himself to declarations. Instead, it delves into the multifaceted and often problematic dynamics that have a profound impact on Balinese culture and people’s psyches.

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VetsinTech Announces Winners of Annual Tech Startup Pitch Competition https://eartdocuments.com/vetsintech-announces-winners-of-annual-tech-startup-pitch-competition/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 05:38:09 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/vetsintech-announces-winners-of-annual-tech-startup-pitch-competition/ Welcome to Thomas Insights – every day we post the latest news and analysis to keep our readers up to date with what’s happening in the industry. register here to get today’s top stories straight to your inbox. Each year, Veterans Day is an opportunity to recognize the sacrifices made by the United States military […]]]>

Welcome to Thomas Insights – every day we post the latest news and analysis to keep our readers up to date with what’s happening in the industry. register here to get today’s top stories straight to your inbox.

Each year, Veterans Day is an opportunity to recognize the sacrifices made by the United States military in support of our country. But the holiday also serves to promote opportunities for veterans as they enter or re-enter the workforce, which is VetsinTech’s main goal.

VetsinTech is a non-profit organization that seeks to support veterans by helping them “connect them to the national tech ecosystem”. Currently, the organization has worked with 70,000 veterans and has 20 chapters across the United States, employing strategies such as boot camps, workshops, and mentorship programs to engage and support veterans in their entrepreneurial goals. .

VetsinTech Startup Pitch Competition 2022

Recently, VetsinTech announced the winners of its second annual startup pitch competition. The event invited new startups to share their business solutions that could fill “a big void in the market”. The only requirement is that the founders of the startup must be veterans or military spouses.

The group recently revealed its finalists. This year’s winner — and winner of the $25,000 grand prize — was Native, a platform described as a secure approach to multilingual messaging that “allows people to communicate in the language they know best.”

The second-place winner received $10,000 and was awarded to startup Zimba, a developer of banking software for financial institutions in emerging markets.

In third place, and winner of $5,000, was a software-as-a-service (SaaS) platform called Parlay. Parlay is designed to help lenders assess loan applications using “alternative credit decision data,” providing more opportunities for banks to engage with communities and underrepresented borrowers.

Ben Lang, CEO of Native, expressed his gratitude for the organization, the event and its sponsors, saying the competition succeeded in creating space and an opportunity for veteran entrepreneurs to pursue their “collective potential”.

Image Credit: Separate View / Shutterstock.com

13 new veteran-owned vendors to stock up on this Veterans DayNext story »

More trade and industry

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journey of honor explores possible career paths | https://eartdocuments.com/journey-of-honor-explores-possible-career-paths/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/journey-of-honor-explores-possible-career-paths/ Students from the Spanish National Honor Society of St. Croix Central High School traveled to Orlando, Florida to visit NASA and other locations on a trip Oct. 23-28. The class trip was not only entertaining but also educational, helping them explore a number of possible career paths. Society advisor Annette Garcia said the students had […]]]>

Students from the Spanish National Honor Society of St. Croix Central High School traveled to Orlando, Florida to visit NASA and other locations on a trip Oct. 23-28. The class trip was not only entertaining but also educational, helping them explore a number of possible career paths.

Society advisor Annette Garcia said the students had a memorable time touring the space shuttle Atlantis, learning about NASA’s pioneering astronauts in Heroes and Legends, which featured the American Astronaut Hall of Fame. Students explored the Apollo/Saturn V Center, home to the 363-foot-long Saturn V rocket, toured NASA areas behind the gates, and interacted with shows and toured exhibits.

The group then visited the Sea Life Aquarium to explore the creatures that live in our seas, rivers and oceans. They passed through Pacific Ocean tunnels, tropical rainforests and an encounter with a shark reef. They identified different habitats around the world, focusing on oceans and rainforests. They also visited Madame Tussauds which provided an entertaining and educational opportunity to learn about the world’s most fascinating celebrities, influential world leaders, historical figures and sports icons.

While visiting Epcot Center, an educational, science and technology theme park, students learned about multilingual communities around the world by visiting pavilions from different countries that demonstrate their understanding of the concept of culture.

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The immigration campaign: on the roads and during the elections https://eartdocuments.com/the-immigration-campaign-on-the-roads-and-during-the-elections/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 22:07:49 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/the-immigration-campaign-on-the-roads-and-during-the-elections/ This article is part of the HPR Massachusetts Election Guide and represents the author’s independent view. “I did it for a better life” – the common words spoken by immigrants on their journey to America. While people may choose to immigrate for a variety of reasons, such as job opportunities, escaping violence, and education, one […]]]>

This article is part of the HPR Massachusetts Election Guide and represents the author’s independent view.

“I did it for a better life” – the common words spoken by immigrants on their journey to America. While people may choose to immigrate for a variety of reasons, such as job opportunities, escaping violence, and education, one reason is certain: people are becoming Americans — and with that, they take on the civic responsibility to vote.

There is no doubt that the political power of immigrants increases every year. In just 20 years, the number of eligible immigrant voters has almost double from 12 million in 2000 to more than 23 million by 2020. This phenomenon raises the following question: to what extent do immigrants influence election results? The answer is heavy, especially in large states. immigrant populations like Massachusetts. With that in mind, candidates running in the 2022 Massachusetts gubernatorial general election must appeal to immigrant voters in order to experience the greatest election-related success.

It’s no secret that the best way to get votes for immigrants is to advocate for policies that support and benefit immigrants. In Massachusetts today, the number one immigrant-related question on the ballot is Question No. 4, a referendum that asks voters to approve or repeal the new law that allows all qualified residents to state, regardless of immigration status, to be issued Massachusetts driver’s licenses. Issue 4, the Work and Family Mobility Act, supports safer roads and safer drivers, as it requires all drivers to meet the same insurance standards and enables all families to use routes to get to work, drop the kids off at school and get to the hospital. appointment. Although these benefits do not appear to be a luxury for most, immigrants barely use public benefits over the general public, despite being taxpayers. In order to allow immigrants, with or without documentation, to feel secure about their access to American infrastructure, Massachusetts driver’s license law must be respected.

For Massachusetts gubernatorial candidate Maura Healey, supporting undocumented residents’ eligibility to apply for a driver’s license is a priority in its actions to defend immigrant communities. She, along with the rest of the MassDems and progressive groups like the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition, believe this is a “common sense” right.

In her work as Attorney General, Healey has already contributed to these measures, notably by addressing language barriers that put immigrants at risk of fraudulent practices in immigration law. Scammers lure immigrants with false promises of obtaining visas, green cards and citizenship in exchange for money. In an effort to protect Massachusetts immigrants from these scams, Healey’s Multilingual Education Campaign, first launched in 2018 by the Attorney General’s Community Engagement Division, provides those at risk with information about these predatory practices through public service announcements, social media posts and in person. coaching.

Healey is leading the way in securing immigrant votes in the upcoming general election with his other candidates immigrant policies, such as expanding language access, health care coverage, and facilitating accessible and meaningful pathways to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Together, these existing initiatives and promised policies speak volumes about the more than 1.2 million immigrants living in Massachusetts, giving Healey a clear advantage over his opponent, Republican candidate Geoff Diehl.

Regarding question #4, Geoff Diehl and the rest of the MassGOP are strongly in favor of the repeal of the law, confirmed by his campaign. Tweeter that the approval of the ballot question was “wonderful news.” For Diehl, allowing undocumented immigrants to hold driver’s licenses puts Massachusetts’ public safety, public health and electoral integrity at risk. Together with Diehl, MassGOP Chairman Jim Lyons, the main contributor to the Recent trumpification of the party, continues to defend these anti-immigration measures. Earlier this year, Lyons and Diehl joined campaign organizers at a signature-raising event to put Question No. 4 on the ballot, which Lyons said was “democracy in action.” Additionally, Diehl is a firm believer in getting tough on the issue of illegal immigration and is advocating for similar positions from the federal government. While Diehl focuses his argument on undocumented people, his message is nevertheless exclusive and therefore potentially unwelcoming to more than undocumented immigrants.

In a heavily blue state where immigrants make up nearly 20% of the population, this trumpified rhetoric from Diehl and the MassGOP is unlikely to win enough support to win the election. While a number of factors are at play, the fact is that Healey currently stalls 26 points ahead of its competitor. Her appeal and her promises to the immigrant community in Massachusetts will surely contribute to her success as Election Day approaches. On November 8, 2022, as immigrants head to the polls, many will vote for a candidate with their shared priorities – someone who tirelessly champions the cause of immigrants.

Image by Allaura Osborne created for use by Harvard Political Review.

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Williamstown Officials Consider Changes to Town Meeting / iBerkshires.com https://eartdocuments.com/williamstown-officials-consider-changes-to-town-meeting-iberkshires-com/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 08:54:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/williamstown-officials-consider-changes-to-town-meeting-iberkshires-com/ WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. — Residents tasked with looking for ways to make town meetings more inclusive and productive this month gave an indication of the kinds of changes on their radar. Board member Randy Fippinger and city moderator Elisabeth Goodman attended the October planning board meeting to update the body and get feedback […]]]>

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. — Residents tasked with looking for ways to make town meetings more inclusive and productive this month gave an indication of the kinds of changes on their radar.

Board member Randy Fippinger and city moderator Elisabeth Goodman attended the October planning board meeting to update the body and get feedback on potential changes the city could want to implement.

The conversation around what some perceive as inefficiencies in the current town meeting format is of particular concern to planners, who in June saw most of their substantive zoning bylaw recommendations sent back to committee without a vote up or down.

At the time, some residents complained that the late hour of the Tuesday evening meeting and lack of information about proposed bylaw changes were reasons the meeting chose not to take action on the items. .

Fippinger checked off a number of possible changes, some aimed at making the town meeting more welcoming to a wider range of residents, including a multilingual town meeting mandate, the provision of childcare services to attendees and, possibly be, moving the meeting to a Saturday.

Fippinger, Goodman and Select Board member Jane Patton make up a task force set up by the Select Board to review the town meeting after the June session ended unsatisfactorily.

Other innovations on their radar include: mailing materials to residents explaining town meeting items, similar to the Secretary of State’s annual mailing on questions from the public on the November ballot; limitation of the session to two hours with a certain date for its resumption if necessary; restructure the mandate so that items that potentially require more discussion, such as zoning regulations, are dealt with earlier; information sessions preceding the municipal assembly; several municipal meetings focusing on different topics; and the use of electronic clickers to register votes, which would speed up the voting process and allow residents to weigh in anonymously.

The latest caught the attention of Planning Board Chair Stephanie Boyd.

“One thing I’m torn about is the clicker thing,” she said. “For me, it comes down to the sense of community. As people, we should make it comfortable for people to have different points of view.

“I love the visual of people standing with their cards. It’s such a wonderful part of the New England character. We also have to be aware that there are casualties.”

Goodman said she has attended town meetings in other communities where secret ballots are more common.

“To me, it’s the discussion that counts, not the actual vote, and people shouldn’t be pressured by their peers to vote,” Goodman said.

“Do you think they are now?” Boyd replied

“Oh, yeah, I know that,” Goodman said.

Fippinger said the task force is considering creating a survey of residents to see what changes, if any, might be warranted.

Planning Council member Peter Beck suggested the city try to create a non-binding question on the ballot for the May municipal election to ask about some of the bigger issues, like bringing in selectors. electronic mail to record votes anonymously.

Key words: city ​​meeting,

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Modernized cinemas are a hit with viewers in Tiruchi https://eartdocuments.com/modernized-cinemas-are-a-hit-with-viewers-in-tiruchi/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 02:57:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/modernized-cinemas-are-a-hit-with-viewers-in-tiruchi/ Catering to a multilingual audience became possible with the increase in the number of cinemas, as Kannada and Telugu blockbusters like Kantara, KGF and RRR sold out in Tiruchi. Catering to a multilingual audience has become possible with the increase in the number of cinemas, such as Kannada and Telugu blockbusters like kantara, KGF and […]]]>

Catering to a multilingual audience became possible with the increase in the number of cinemas, as Kannada and Telugu blockbusters like Kantara, KGF and RRR sold out in Tiruchi.

Catering to a multilingual audience has become possible with the increase in the number of cinemas, such as Kannada and Telugu blockbusters like kantara, KGF and RRR sold out in Tiruchi

Cinemas in Tiruchi are upgrading their facilities to wean audiences off the internet-based over-the-top (OTT) entertainment platform and bring them the multiplex experience.

“When the movie is good and the theater is well maintained, customers don’t hesitate to pay the higher ticket prices. Previously, only festival releases reigned supreme at the box office; any movie with a good story these days draws crowds year-round,” said A. Joseph Francis, Managing Partner, LA Cinemas. The Hindu.

On Friday, LA Cinemas, which operates several theaters in the city and central districts, launched two more screens in addition to the existing theater complex on Fort Station Road. “We have renovated our 230-seat Maxi and 95-seat Mini theaters to meet a growing viewer base. Although there was a lull in business for a few months last year, people came back to the cinema just for the experience of going out with friends and family,” Mr. Francis said.

A change in the film exhibition model also helped revive the business. “Previously, the same film would circulate in several cinemas in the city after being released on a single screen; now the demand for cinemas in the city to show the same films on the same days has increased. After lockdown, audiences are back in cinemas,” a BHELEC cinema management representative told Kailasapuram. The room, built in 1974, reopened in a modern avatar in 2019 with improved technology.

Accommodating a multilingual audience has also become possible with the increase in the number of cinemas. Kannada and Telugu blockbusters like kantara, KGF and RRR sold out in Tiruchi, while the market for Hollywood and Tamil dubbed films is also buoyant, the BHELEC representative said.

The big screens are an added bonus for enjoying movies with special effects and dramatic fight sequences.

“Tamil movie VikramName had an OTT release shortly after its theatrical release, but viewers still flocked to the halls to watch it. The success of Ponninyin Selvan: 1 is largely due to its cinematography which is best seen on the big screen,” Mr. Francis said.

Declining business at its 38-year-old hall in Tiruverumbur forced the Shanthi Theater to close for a full interior renovation in March 2021 and reopen as Shanthi Cinemas in February this year. “We upgraded our lobby and added air conditioning. The sound effects are better thanks to the new systems we have installed, and we have reduced the number of seats from 476 to 369, to create a less crowded atmosphere,” said owner A. Balamurugan.

Several modern cinemas have also opened doors in Sangliandapuram and Tiruvanaikovil, and are doing well, helped by online ticket booking.

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Bybit invests in KOSDAQ-listed T-Scientific https://eartdocuments.com/bybit-invests-in-kosdaq-listed-t-scientific/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 17:45:02 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/bybit-invests-in-kosdaq-listed-t-scientific/ per bitBybit invests in KOSDAQ-listed T-Scientific – Crypto giant seeks partnership with 3rd largest shareholder of Korean regulated exchange Bithumb 24-Oct-2022 / 19:45 CET/CEST Bybit invests in KOSDAQ-listed T-ScientificCrypto giant seeks partnership with 3rd largest shareholder of Korean regulated stock exchange Bithumb PRESS RELEASE BY PARBIT SEOUL, Republic of Korea | October 24, 2022 11:22 […]]]>

per bit
Bybit invests in KOSDAQ-listed T-Scientific – Crypto giant seeks partnership with 3rd largest shareholder of Korean regulated exchange Bithumb
24-Oct-2022 / 19:45 CET/CEST

Bybit invests in KOSDAQ-listed T-Scientific
Crypto giant seeks partnership with 3rd largest shareholder of Korean regulated stock exchange Bithumb

PRESS RELEASE BY PARBIT

SEOUL, Republic of Korea | October 24, 2022 11:22 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time

per bit announced the completion of a convertible bond investment in T-Scientific Co., Ltd. (“T-Scientific”), listed on KOSDAQ. The move now lays the groundwork for Bybit to explore market expansion and new investment opportunities beyond partnerships in the Korean blockchain market.

On September 30, 2022, T-Scientific announced the issuance of convertible bonds with an aggregate principal amount of 16 billion won, of which 5.5 billion won was acquired by Bybit on October 19, 2022.

Through the relationship with T-Scientific, Bybit has opened up the possibility of further exploring the Korean blockchain and NFT markets with regulated Korean partners; part of Bybit’s ambition to conduct all Korean business operations responsibly.

Listed on KOSDAQ, T-Scientific is an IT company operating a mobile coupon platform. It is also the third largest shareholder in Bithumb, a Korean virtual asset exchange, and is actively expanding its blockchain business through its subsidiary Hanbitco Korea.

Although it already enjoys strong financial support from its parent companies, T-Scientific is seeking to attract investment from global players such as Bybit, in order to further improve its financial position, increase its commercial reach into other blockchain businesses and ultimately consolidate its leadership position. in the Korean blockchain and NFT market.

In particular, T-Scientific is looking forward to further business collaboration, such as pushing Korean projects globally and consolidating the company’s position in the Korean market through Bybit’s investment and its recent acquisition of Hanbitco.

Bybit is a cryptocurrency exchange established in March 2018 that offers a professional platform where crypto traders can find a super-fast matching engine, excellent customer service, and multilingual community support. Bybit is a proud partner of Formula 1 racing team, Oracle Red Bull Racing, esports teams NAVI, Astralis, Alliance, Virtus.pro, Made in Brazil (MIBR), City Esports and Oracle Red Bull Racing Esports, and association football (soccer) teams Borussia Dortmund and Avispa Fukuoka.

Contact Details

per bit

press@bybit.com

Company Website

https://www.bybit.com/en-US/

Broadcast of a CORPORATE NEWS, transmitted by EQS Group.
The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.

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Store, post office become landmark | News, Sports, Jobs https://eartdocuments.com/store-post-office-become-landmark-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 04:16:06 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/store-post-office-become-landmark-news-sports-jobs/ The Bedilion family store and post office, bearing Clément’s initials, would remain in operation until 1955. (Photo provided) Downstream from Matamoras, at the intersection of Washington County Route 14 and Ohio State Route 7, is a small cluster of homes known as Wade, Ohio. At this point, Rea’s Run enters the […]]]>

The Bedilion family store and post office, bearing Clément’s initials, would remain in operation until 1955. (Photo provided)

Downstream from Matamoras, at the intersection of Washington County Route 14 and Ohio State Route 7, is a small cluster of homes known as Wade, Ohio. At this point, Rea’s Run enters the Ohio River.

A store was established in Wade by Robert Wiley Bedilion and his wife, the former Mary Louise Mannsperger. This crossroads general merchandise grocery store has become a landmark for travelers and an institution in the hamlet and its surroundings. River traffic would also stop there.

The Bedilion family is originally from Alsace-Lorraine, between France, Germany, Belgium and Switzerland. It was Abraham Bedilion, born in 1799, who left his native land to emigrate to America. He first became a surveyor and left at the age of 25 to cross the Atlantic.

Arriving in Maryland, he met and married Margaret DeVere and the couple moved to Pennsylvania to open a tavern in Triadelphia. They will have eleven children. The father and one of the sons, Robert, bought 100 wooded acres at the mouth of Rea’s Run to sell lumber and ties to a railroad company that never came into existence.

Robert married Mary in 1864 and the couple decided to move to the family land at Rea’s Run. His parents did not come with the couple.

Robert was fluent in English, German and French. He and his wife established the store and in 1868 a post office was set up in the store. There, Robert used his multilingual skills to act as an interpreter while the newcomers learned their new language.

RW and Mary would raise nine children. A daughter, Abigail Louise, married a steamboat owner, Fred Hornbrook., who at one time owned the dockside ship Matamoras in partnership with Harry Donnally. One of their sons, Robert Henry, would continue to operate the store and post office after his father’s death in 1898. Mary survived until 1932 and was remembered in Wade’s neighborhood by her nickname, Mama B.

The third generation of the Bedilion family will see Robert Henry’s son Clement operate the store and post office until 1955.

John Miller is president of the Matamoras Area Historical Society. Membership fees are $15 per year alone/couple. Lifetime membership is $150. Contact the society at PO Box 1846, New Matamoras, Ohio 45767. Much of this column is built on the work of Matamoras historian, the late Diana McMahan.



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