elementary school – Eart Documents http://eartdocuments.com/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 18:20:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://eartdocuments.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-07-01T001347.882.png elementary school – Eart Documents http://eartdocuments.com/ 32 32 Mandy Peterson: Student became a Cherokee elementary school teacher | News https://eartdocuments.com/mandy-peterson-student-became-a-cherokee-elementary-school-teacher-news/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/mandy-peterson-student-became-a-cherokee-elementary-school-teacher-news/ Fourth-grade language arts teacher Mandy Peterson loves Cherokee Elementary. It was there that she attended elementary school as a student, served as a teaching assistant, and taught for eight of her 16 years as an instructor. She will soon defend her thesis at Milligan University. The Johnson City Press recently asked her several questions about […]]]>

Fourth-grade language arts teacher Mandy Peterson loves Cherokee Elementary.

It was there that she attended elementary school as a student, served as a teaching assistant, and taught for eight of her 16 years as an instructor. She will soon defend her thesis at Milligan University.

The Johnson City Press recently asked her several questions about her work and the challenges of teaching during the pandemic.

When did you realize you wanted to become a teacher?

I think I always knew I wanted to be a teacher. When I was a student in Cherokee, I loved coming to school every day.

As I considered another avenue for a while after graduating from college, I knew it was ultimately my calling because nothing else was up to snuff and brought me the joy of working with students.

What is the best part of your job?

The best parts of my job are the relationships I’ve built with students, families, and colleagues. The support I receive from my parents and my colleagues allows me to face the challenges that arise.

A close second is watching the excitement grow in my students throughout the year. I love when they connect with a book we are reading and beg to read more or improve in a specific area that has been a challenge for them.

Just recently, I was talking with a colleague about how my students’ writing skills improved this year. I love seeing that excitement when they feel confident in themselves or make a connection with something I taught them.

Sounds like you have a strong connection to Cherokee Elementary School. Did that play a role in your decision to teach there now?

As I mentioned earlier, I loved attending Cherokee. In fact, one of my closest friends is a teacher I had at school here. I used to come visit Dianne Cantrell when I came home and saw her car here after hours.

She is and always has been a huge influence on me, and I try to emulate a lot of the things I loved about her in the classroom. She still volunteers to help me in my class and I was lucky enough to be her teaching partner for a few years before she retired. I am also still in contact with many of my other teachers.

As I spent eight years teaching sixth grade at Indian Trail, I knew I would eventually love to come back and teach at Cherokee.

What has been the most important lesson that educators have learned over the past two years?

I think the most important lesson we’ve learned over the past two years is the importance of relationships and social and emotional learning.

While teaching practically last year allowed me to see how students were able to continue to learn and succeed at home, I also know that many of them were very excited when we were able to come together in person for certain days and events or to have meetings. for online interactions that were not academically focused.

While I was grateful for the opportunity we had to meet virtually, I looked forward to being back in class with my students, and I know many of them missed the daily interactions with each other. others.

After two years of teaching during a pandemic, how optimistic are you about the future?

I am optimistic that as teachers we have learned to become more intentional with our lessons and practices to get the most out of each lesson and activity and to include opportunities for students to build relationships.

We know it is important to make the most of the time we spend with each other as students are away for various periods due to illness or quarantine.

I am hopeful that as things continue to move towards a more “normal” way of life in the classroom, we will remember the importance of these things and continue to integrate social learning opportunities. emotional in our lessons.

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DMPS offers ASL lessons to parents to help them communicate better with their children https://eartdocuments.com/dmps-offers-asl-lessons-to-parents-to-help-them-communicate-better-with-their-children/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 03:45:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/dmps-offers-asl-lessons-to-parents-to-help-them-communicate-better-with-their-children/ Capitol View Elementary School offers ASL classes for parents of students who are hard of hearing or deaf, to help bridge the gap. DES MOINES, Iowa — After noticing a disconnect between deaf and hard of hearing students and their parents, Capitol View Elementary School is working to bridge the gap. In January, school staff […]]]>

Capitol View Elementary School offers ASL classes for parents of students who are hard of hearing or deaf, to help bridge the gap.

DES MOINES, Iowa — After noticing a disconnect between deaf and hard of hearing students and their parents, Capitol View Elementary School is working to bridge the gap.

In January, school staff began offering American Sign Language classes to parents and others who have a relationship with deaf students.

Polly Brekke, Deaf/Hard of Hearing Program Coordinator, said 18 Capitol View students are deaf or hard of hearing. She said those weekly classes are important now because they weren’t offered as much during the pandemic.

“Sign language classes are really hard to come by,” Brekke said. “They’re just not available. In the past, you could find them within the deaf community, in churches. But being able to offer sign language lessons to our families is exciting.”

One of the parents of the class, Lindsay McCrea, discovered that her two daughters had hearing loss when they were three years old. One of his daughters, Echo Beveridge, accompanies him to class.

Lindsay said the first sign of Echo’s hearing loss was speech delay. For years after his diagnosis, communication between the two was difficult.

“It was super frustrating,” McCrea said. “Not only to have a conversation with them, but even at three years old they’re mean…it can make the simplest things like going to the grocery store so difficult.”

But, she says, when that opportunity presented itself, she jumped at the chance to grab it. Now she learns more every week.

“It helped so much,” McCrea said.

Coherent learning is what class teacher Lacey McCaffrey said is so important.

“There is a need for [kids] communicate with my family members, and when I was growing up my parents could hear and that was hard for me,” McCaffrey said. “I’m deaf and most of my life communication has been hard for me.”

McCaffrey hopes bringing this course to parents will prevent other children from experiencing what she did.

Brekke said the school plans to start offering an ASL 2 class after spring break. This course will take place on Mondays at 5:30 p.m. in the school library.

This will be in addition to the ASL 1 course, which is offered Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. at the same location.

WATCH | Latino community leaders call for action after deadly shooting outside East High School

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US Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona visits the Dickinson Museum https://eartdocuments.com/us-secretary-of-education-miguel-cardona-visits-the-dickinson-museum/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 18:10:42 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/us-secretary-of-education-miguel-cardona-visits-the-dickinson-museum/ AMHERST — Friday, March 4, was a busy day for Miguel Cardona, U.S. Secretary of Education, who began with an early morning visit to Rafael Hernández K-8 Elementary School in Boston, Boston’s oldest bilingual community school of the city, where he spoke with students, teachers, parents and others about multilingual learning. Next, it was at […]]]>

AMHERST — Friday, March 4, was a busy day for Miguel Cardona, U.S. Secretary of Education, who began with an early morning visit to Rafael Hernández K-8 Elementary School in Boston, Boston’s oldest bilingual community school of the city, where he spoke with students, teachers, parents and others about multilingual learning.

Next, it was at MIT Sloan School of Management for a lecture on the 50th anniversary of the passage of Title IX, the landmark legislation that dramatically expanded opportunities for girls to play school sports.

Cardona, a Connecticut native who became the nation’s 12th education secretary a year ago, then traveled to Amherst to get a taste of local literary history: he visited the Emily Dickinson Museum, then chatted with students from Amherst College studying Dickinson about what it was like to examine the famous poet’s work so closely.

“The deep knowledge I have of Dickinson is due to the last hours,” he said outside the museum after his visit. “I learned a lot today, especially about the value of being able to read and work with primary sources. I asked one of the students to read one of (Dickinson’s) poems in her room. was really special.

In fact, a key part of Cardona’s interest in visiting the site was to speak with students about their experience using the Dickinson Homestead for their studies. He said he was interested in examining the role non-traditional learning environments can play in expanding educational opportunities for students.

“When we think about reinventing education, it’s really important that we consider experiential education and how we can connect with museums and other primary sources of information,” he said. “Let’s see how (primary sources) can be brought into schools and how schools can access them.

“We learned during the pandemic that you don’t have to be in a traditional school,” Cardona added. “We have to accept this as we think about giving our students better opportunities to learn.”

Cardona said he was also intrigued by the connections within the Five College system, as well as the close relationship between Amherst College and the museum, which is owned by the school but operates independently.

After her tour — her first visit to the property — Cardona and students from a Dickinson seminar taught by Karen Sánchez-Eppler, a professor of American studies and English at Amherst, huddled together in a cold room in the Dickinson house. to discuss some of these issues. (The museum has been closed to the public in recent years due to the pandemic and extensive restoration work.)

“What does it mean to learn in this kind of environment? Cardona asked. “You are inside a place (of primary documents). How does it impact your learning when you are literally able to read a poem in the (Dickinson’s) bedroom? »

The students touched on a number of things – for example, how the intimacy of reading one of Dickinson’s handwritten manuscripts in one’s own home can give them a kind of emotional understanding of a poem or letter that doesn’t cannot necessarily be acquired by reading this poetry. in, say, a library carrel.

“It’s special to see and get a sense of where she wrote,” said Fiona Anstey, a sophomore who grew up in Japan. “You can look out the windows and see something from what she saw.”

“It makes you feel really connected to her and her writing,” added Christian Pattavina, also a sophomore.

Cardona also asked students about their experience with the Five College system; students responded that there were many resources available in the system, from books to a range of courses they could attend at different local campuses, which enriched their education and gave them a sense of direction in their own work.

Cardona, a native of Meriden, Connecticut, whose first language is Spanish, began his teaching career as an elementary school teacher and later became principal at the age of 27, overseeing a school where l Bilingual education was key. Her doctoral work examined the gaps between English language learners and their classmates. He later served as a school superintendent and teacher of education in Connecticut.

At the Dickinson House, he told the students he appreciated their comments. “My goal is to listen to you and bring back what you said to DC and see how we can find ways to bring this kind of learning model to other places.”

Before leaving, he added that visiting the Dickinson Museum was “a great way to kick off Women’s History Month and recognize the contributions…of Emily Dickinson, and how her poetry has been continued and preserved by the women who shared it (with the world). She transformed the genre – what a powerful testament.

Steve Pfarrer can be contacted at spfarrer@gazettenet.com.

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Some school districts in rural San Diego county can’t pause with COVID https://eartdocuments.com/some-school-districts-in-rural-san-diego-county-cant-pause-with-covid/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 13:00:34 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/some-school-districts-in-rural-san-diego-county-cant-pause-with-covid/ PINE VALLEY — In rural school districts like Mountain Empire in San Diego County, COVID is hitting especially hard. A triple whammy of pandemic-related issues — insufficient staff, frequent absentee students, lack of reliable internet — has hit virtually every school, but its impact is compounded in rural schools by the distance and isolation they […]]]>

PINE VALLEY — In rural school districts like Mountain Empire in San Diego County, COVID is hitting especially hard.

A triple whammy of pandemic-related issues — insufficient staff, frequent absentee students, lack of reliable internet — has hit virtually every school, but its impact is compounded in rural schools by the distance and isolation they face. clean.

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Just ask Mountain Empire Superintendent Patrick Keeley. For two months this winter, he was named principal and vice-principal of the only high school in his district. This is because the principal and deputy principal were recruited from schools in large cities.

It’s hard for him to find new employees, he says, not just because of COVID, but because he has to convince job applicants that it’s worth driving 30 miles or more a day in the hills to work in their schools.

Mountain Empire Unified School District superintendent Dr. Pat Keely visited one of his district’s elementary schools on Tuesday, February 1, 2022 in San Diego County, California.

(Nelvin C. Cepeda/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

“When you talk about rural education inequities, we don’t have the resources,” Keeley said. “I really think rural education has been affected, and it regularly is, by larger events, whether it’s COVID, recessions, any of those things.”

The state recently reported that 35% of Mountain Empire students were chronically absent last year, meaning they missed at least 10% of the school year. This is worse than the 22% who were chronically absent two years earlier. This is an increase largely related to COVID.

Many schools saw higher than usual absences last year, when school sometimes meant logging onto a computer at home, rather than coming to a campus. But even when school doors have reopened, some rural schools are still struggling.

” Let’s be realistic ; this has been difficult for all schools in California, but… these rural schools have very complex transportation, connectivity and staffing issues. It’s very, very difficult,” said Tim Taylor, executive director of California’s Small School Districts’ Association.

A student in an honors math class works on today's assignment at Mountain Empire High School.

A student in an honors math class works on today’s assignment at Mountain Empire High School.

(Nelvin C. Cepeda/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Mountain Empire already had attendance issues before COVID. It is a sprawling 660 square mile district, with seven schools serving 1,700 students. The eastern side of the district borders the Imperial County deserts and its southern side borders Mexico.

It has eight bus drivers – two less than the district needs – and 10 van drivers who transport the 90% of students who rely on buses to get to school.

Mountain Empire students are diverse – they live on farms, trailer parks, housing estates, and three Indian reservations served by the district. Some families have moved here for the open spaces and quiet; others have moved here because they cannot afford to live in the city or in the suburbs down the hill.

Many Mountain Empire students have high needs. Three in five come from low-income families and about one in three is learning English.

But many of the reasons for their absences were beyond the control of students and schools.

Children line up by assigned class for the start of the school day at Campo Elementary School.

Children line up by assigned class for the start of the school day at Campo Elementary School.

(Nelvin C. Cepeda/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Chief among them last school year was the lack of reliable internet. Students were supposed to learn online, but there are gaps in data coverage across the district, and some areas are only served by small data providers.

County school officials offered Verizon Internet hotspots for school districts to give to students who did not have Internet access.

But in Mountain Empire, due to topography, Verizon only works along major roads, so the district has purchased its own AT&T hotspots, costing the district about four times as much per student, said Keeley. But even AT&T doesn’t cover all parts of the district.

In October 2020, Mountain Empire reopened its school campuses for part-time in-person instruction, but it has struggled to stay open consistently.

The following month, the district closed for two weeks as it had to quarantine nearly all of its transportation service due to COVID cases. This was a problem because the vast majority of students depend on buses to get to school.

Sign posted at all school entrances in the Mountain Empire Unified School District.

Sign posted at all school entrances in the Mountain Empire Unified School District stating that anyone entering the building must wear a mask, as required by the California Department of Public Health.

(Nelvin C. Cepeda/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

The district returned to distance learning and had planned to reopen after the Thanksgiving break. But four days of high winds and power outages forced the district to remain closed, Keeley said.

Mountain Empire has returned to remote learning whenever it has had to shut down unexpectedly, Keeley said. Each time, however, it risked having students absent due to connectivity issues, he said.

Not only was it difficult to get children to school, but it was difficult to find enough adults.

Job applicants declined interviews the district attempted to arrange once the applicants realized how far away the Mountain Empire schools were.

Keeley can’t offer to pay employees as well as large school districts. This is partly because 7% of the district’s budget, or about $2 million, automatically goes to bus transportation.

Students work on their graphic arts homework at Mountain Empire High School.

Students work on their graphic arts homework at Mountain Empire High School.

(Nelvin C. Cepeda/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Most school districts charge parents for the bus, but Mountain Empire doesn’t because many of its students come from low-income families, Keeley said.

This means Keeley has less money to pay his staff. The starting salary for teachers at Mountain Empire is $47,377, which is $3,400 less than what San Diego Unified offers. Mountain Empire only pays substitute teachers $150 a day, compared to $250 for San Diego Unified.

Mountain Empire has approximately nine substitute teachers for the entire district of 110 educators. Keeley ideally wants at least 20 to 25.

“It’s always been a challenge here with the subs, but this is unreal,” he said of the pandemic.

It’s not just about new employees; the district lost other opportunities to larger districts, Keeley said.

Mountain Empire Unified School District Superintendent Dr. Pat Keely paid a visit.

Mountain Empire Unified School District Superintendent Dr. Pat Keely visited and spoke with Campo Elementary School staff while watching school children arrive at school.

(Nelvin C. Cepeda/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Earlier this year, Keeley hoped to strike a deal with an organization that would offer after-school and summer programs. But the organization said it would not be able to work with Mountain Empire because it had a bigger deal with a larger school district.

Amid the disruption, Mountain Empire students’ performance on standardized tests plummeted last year.

About 71% of its students failed to meet state standards in English and 85% failed in math. That’s worse than in the 2018-19 school year, when 63% failed to meet English standards and 76% failed in math.

To improve academics, Keeley said the district is focusing on reading in the early grades by staffing each elementary school with a literacy specialist.

“I wouldn’t call it learning loss. It’s just that we need to create interventions to close the gaps and catch up with students,” said Mona Noren, principal of Campo Elementary School in Mountain Empire.

Despite the challenges, says Keeley, her students are resilient. After all, many get up early and walk out into the cold to catch the 6 a.m. bus and make the hour-long trip to school.

Schoolchildren arrive at Campo Elementary School Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022, in San Diego County, California.

Schoolchildren arrive at Campo Elementary School Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022, in San Diego County, California.

(Nelvin C. Cepeda/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

And every weekday morning, Keeley drives more than 30 miles from her home in Santee to Mountain Empire. He grew up here and went to school here and speaks fondly of the neighborhood.

It describes how, in the fall, families gather to watch Friday night football at the high school stadium, which is framed by a wide backdrop of mountains and open skies. Families here trust principals and teachers, he said, because they’ve been in the community for decades.

“This school meant a lot to me when I was a kid, this district did that,” Keeley said. “So to try to come back, to try to be a part of it, to help improve and help improve the lives of the kids here in any way we can, is pretty important.”

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Emerson hires new associate director of English language learning https://eartdocuments.com/emerson-hires-new-associate-director-of-english-language-learning/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 04:55:13 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/emerson-hires-new-associate-director-of-english-language-learning/ Amy Rinaldo, the college’s new Associate Director of English Language Learning. (Photo courtesy of Amy Rinaldo) In her new role in the Office of International Student Affairs, Amy Rinaldo will work with international students to help them celebrate their multilingual community, develop their English skills, and foster their academic and professional growth. Rinaldo took the […]]]>

Amy Rinaldo, the college’s new Associate Director of English Language Learning. (Photo courtesy of Amy Rinaldo)

In her new role in the Office of International Student Affairs, Amy Rinaldo will work with international students to help them celebrate their multilingual community, develop their English skills, and foster their academic and professional growth.

Rinaldo took the post of associate director of English language learning on January 10, seven months after the departure of his predecessor Jeremy Heflin. Rinaldo, who served as Associate Director of English Language Programs at Brandeis University for seven years, will be the primary advisor for English language support for international students.

“I’m looking at some of the different courses we offer and how we might want to improve them a bit for next fall. I plan to offer other programs to international students to facilitate part of their linguistic and social development.

“It’s a bit of everything,” she said. “Trying to be really comprehensive and holistic in how we can support students.”

According to Andrea Popa, Director of International Student Affairs, Rinaldo proved to be an ideal candidate during the hiring process due to his extensive education background and cross-cultural experience abroad.

“We were specifically looking for not just someone with an academic background, but someone who could demonstrate a connection to other cultures,” Popa said.

Rinaldo graduated from the University of California, San Diego in 2008 with a bachelor’s degree in art history, before moving to Suzhou, China to teach English at an elementary school. During her year-long stay, she said she suffered “culture shock”, but was held there by her love of teaching.

“Every time I walked into my class, I couldn’t be in a bad mood,” Rinaldo said. “I was having a stressful day – maybe a ‘cultural’ interaction on the way to work – and then I walked into my classroom. Even if I was nervous, depressed or homesick, as soon as I was with students, everything went away.

Although her professional career has taken a different turn than expected – shifting from an interest in art history to linguistics and language acquisition – Rinaldo remains passionate about liberal arts pedagogy.

“I’ve always been very interested in the arts,” she says. “So being able to work in an environment with students who are in these communication majors, I found that I was really interested in working with this student population.”

Rinaldo said she was particularly interested in how international students fit into Emerson’s program to promote diversity, equity and inclusion, noting the college’s efforts to diversify its curriculum.

“I find a lot of schools welcome international students, but there’s kind of an unspoken responsibility for international students to assimilate,” she said. “If we think about real globalization, real internationalization, it should come from both sides.”


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Deering graduate teacher teams up to create ‘miraculous’ communication app https://eartdocuments.com/deering-graduate-teacher-teams-up-to-create-miraculous-communication-app/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 09:00:55 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/deering-graduate-teacher-teams-up-to-create-miraculous-communication-app/ Aidan Blum Levine is only 19, but his first introduction to coding was so long ago that he can’t even remember. In early elementary school, he used basic coding to create his own games, then moved on to websites. By the time he graduated from Deering High School last spring, he had developed several web-based […]]]>

Aidan Blum Levine is only 19, but his first introduction to coding was so long ago that he can’t even remember.

In early elementary school, he used basic coding to create his own games, then moved on to websites. By the time he graduated from Deering High School last spring, he had developed several web-based applications, including one created with his computer science teacher that is now used in local schools to improve communication between teachers, students and the parents.

Aiden Blum Levine teaches Henry Townsend-O’Neill at the Open Bench Project in Portland. Photo courtesy of Aidan Blum Levine

This app, ReachMyTeach, could expand to more schools thanks to a significant financial investment from Faria Education Group, a company that supports education systems and services in schools in 155 countries. Jeffrey Borland, the Deering teacher who created the app with Levine, said they are unable to disclose the amount of this investment because it is confidential.

Levine’s ability to create a game-changing app came as no surprise to people who worked with him and saw his passion for coding.

“I’m in awe of him,” Borland said.

Levine, now a freshman at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, grew up in Somerville, Massachusetts, before moving to Portland 10 years ago. He said he’s always loved coding and making electronics, but the coding part wasn’t easy at first.

“I thought coding was cool and I tried to learn it for five years, but I didn’t do anything until it finally clicked in my head,” he said. . “It took me a little while to really get to the point where I was passionate, but I’m glad I persevered.”

Levine’s passion for computing grew as he attended fun summer camps at Open Bench Project, a shared learning/working space in Portland, shortly after moving to the city. During these camps, he built an arcade cabinet and worked with others on a Rube Goldberg machine, a chain-reaction contraption that accomplishes a single task in an indirect or overly complicated way.

For the past few years, Levine has helped teach these camps to young children who share his passion. Kids gravitate to Levine, who is curious, ready to dig into projects and is always learning, said Jake Ryan, founder and director of Open Bench.

“He is kind and generous with his time. He’s a great kid to have around the shop,” Ryan said.

Borland, Professor Deering, first taught Levine in an AP statistics class when Levine was in eighth grade. The teacher immediately recognized his student’s programming skills and over the next five years helped him connect with college professors. Borland also encouraged him to tackle projects to improve his skills.

“I think what I do best in this world is programming. Aidan does the tricks around me,” said Borland, who works as a freelance computer scientist. one like him for all my years as a teacher. He’s on a different level, but he’s humble about it.

Borland may have immediately recognized Levine’s talent, but Levine said he had “a pretty steep learning curve” when learning how to develop web applications.

“I had tried to make it for long stretches and had a lot of bad ones,” he said. “With each, I would find something else to learn.”

In high school, Levine created Winditions, a website that features user-collected conditions for winter sports. When the pandemic hit and her sister was trying to adjust to the remote college, Levine created an app called “Oops! I forgot!” which syncs Google Classroom data, alarms, calendars, and reminders into one platform to help students stay organized.

Late last winter, Borland was thinking of ways to improve the way staff at the Portland school communicate with students and parents, especially when dealing with families where English is not the main language spoken at home. He approached Levine to help with the project, and within three weeks, ReachMyTeach was born.

The web app is relatively simple and works similar to Gmail. It allows users to text or email a student or parent, multiple people, or an entire class. Messages are automatically translated into the family’s original language if it’s not English. Parents can respond in the language of their choice.

ReachMyTeach is now used in Portland Public Schools and South Portland Middle and High Schools.

“It’s a complete game-changer in terms of communicating with families,” said Rebecca Stern, principal at Memorial Middle School in South Portland.

Stern said the “miraculous program” drastically reduces the process of contacting parents. This has been particularly helpful this year, as schools in South Portland are taking in a large number of English-learning students, many of whom have arrived as asylum seekers from African countries. Many of their families don’t speak English, but can easily text teachers about their children, she said.

Kelly Thornhill sees these same benefits at East End Community School in Portland, where she is vice-principal. At a time when there’s a lot on teachers’ plates, the app makes it easier and more efficient to communicate with parents, she said. She thinks it works so well for Portland schools because it was designed by a local student and teacher.

“It’s really designed for our students and our families,” she says.

The app’s launch in Portland schools last fall was especially helpful for school nurses like Lizzie Nalli at Deering. Having the ability to quickly message parents drastically reduced the time she spent texting while tracing contacts and reminding students about pool tests.

Levine and Borland regularly talk with staff about how the app works and make adjustments, like adding read receipts and other features teachers have requested.

“It’s just amazing because they’re so responsive and developing the software. All of a sudden they changed it and there’s another thing that makes it even better,” Nalli said. “I have never used a program whose software developers I knew and they are continually improving it.”

With the Faria partnership in place, Levine and Borland expect to be able to continue to improve the app and expand its use to more schools in the United States and other countries. The company will help with aspects of app development that Levine and Borland are less experienced with, including marketing.

Levine, who lives on the MIT campus, said his current goal is to polish the app and launch it at other schools. He plans to return to Open Bench this summer to help with camps and, at some point, has to decide on a major.

“I’m a little undecided. I’ve done a lot of IT stuff, so that would be the easiest route,” he said. “But I’m not sure I want to do this as a career. I enjoy it as a hobby.


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this is how i can discuss science with you https://eartdocuments.com/this-is-how-i-can-discuss-science-with-you/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 21:52:39 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/this-is-how-i-can-discuss-science-with-you/ Masks make lip reading impossible and can impede understanding for hearing-impaired scientists.Credit: Tauseef Mustafa/AFP via Getty In 1986, when I was 18 months old, pediatricians told my parents that I had profound deafness and would remain unable to speak and would have to spend my life in an institution for the disabled. But even at […]]]>

Masks make lip reading impossible and can impede understanding for hearing-impaired scientists.Credit: Tauseef Mustafa/AFP via Getty

In 1986, when I was 18 months old, pediatricians told my parents that I had profound deafness and would remain unable to speak and would have to spend my life in an institution for the disabled. But even at that young age, academia affected my life. Instead of accepting this prediction, my father, Ingo Meuthen, a hematologist and oncologist, found international publications describing how to teach children like me to read and talk on lips. So, instead of learning sign language, I finally became able to read lips and speak both German and English.

Many children with disabilities are rejected by the general population. This can motivate them to work especially hard to be accepted and recognized later in life.1. My elementary school teachers, for example, warned my parents that my disability meant that I was not fit to pursue higher education. But, thanks to the support of my parents and my reliance on textbooks rather than teachers, I graduated with a degree in biology from the University of Bonn, Germany. Immediately after, I stayed in college to pursue a PhD in evolutionary ecology with a focus on phenotypic plasticity, while working intermittently at odd jobs outside of academia, such as writing for journals and assisting in communications. science through public exhibitions.

My applications for jobs outside of academia are routinely met with disdain by interviewers after they realize I can’t take phone calls. This is never a problem in academia (see “Tips for helping hearing-impaired scientists”) – I find my colleagues readily adopt alternative methods of communication, such as texting or talking face-to-face so that I can read lips.

The acute visual perception that partly compensates for my hearing loss led me to observe animal behavior in my university studies. Evolutionary ecologist Theo Bakker, my thesis supervisor, and his student Timo Thünken used one-on-one communication to guide me. They sometimes wrote hard-to-lip words.

Some parts of academia are less appealing to lipreaders like me. If left unresolved, they can become a career bottleneck for hearing impaired researchers2and thus limit the academic diversity that benefits science.

Group meeting issues

Regular group meetings, intended to promote scientific exchanges, remain a challenge for me. I cannot follow the discussions with frequent changes between speakers. It helps that no one judges my performance or expects me to be fully informed afterwards.

Denis Meuthen conducting field research near a small river.

Evolutionary ecologist Denis Meuthen in the field.Credit: Denis Meuthen

Supervisors of hearing-impaired researchers can compensate for this problem by designating someone to take minutes of meetings and email them shortly after. After completing my PhD, I accepted a postdoctoral position at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Canada. Here I learned that native English speakers are more difficult to lip-read than those who learned it as a second language, perhaps because the latter have invested more time in consciously learning the pronunciation. However, the welcoming nature of my supervisors, the evolutionary ecologists Douglas Chivers and Maud Ferrari, was not marred by this fact, and the academic freedom they gave me allowed me to carry out a research project at large scale on how the environment in which parents live affects the development of their offspring.

I always thrive on teaching and mentoring students, but courses in which students consecutively present their work to develop their science communication skills are more challenging for me. This is because lip reading is a mentally intense activity. In such classes, having extra teaching staff on hand to intermittently take over while I recuperate is helpful.

Another challenge is attending and presenting at conferences, where attendees are expected to follow conversations in large auditoriums. Lip reading over long distances is impossible. At first, I avoided giving lectures and instead chose poster presentations to present my research; in this format, close-up personal communication is the norm. Later, I learned to let listeners know about my disability and asked that they ask questions in person after my speech. Alternatively, the questioners can come on stage, or the session chairs can repeat the questions while standing next to me.

As a conference attendee, even sitting in the front row of a conference, I have difficulty reading lips when speakers stand far away, walk back and forth, or have their backs to the audience. It helps when session chairs remind speakers to stand close to the front row and face the audience at all times3.

Masking and virtual understanding

Shortly after returning to Germany to take up another postdoctoral position at the University of Bielefeld under evolutionary biologist Klaus Reinhold, the pandemic hit. Suddenly everyone started wearing masks. This made lip reading impossible. Additionally, all meetings went virtual overnight. In virtual meetings, technological limitations impede verbal comprehension for hearing-impaired researchers4.

Meeting slides with bullet points or other written text are informative and my primary means of understanding. I often find myself lost when speakers show a series of photos of animals to present their research while verbally conveying their findings: the slides may be beautiful, but they lack the scientific information I need. Because these non-informative slides are widely used and following scientific discussions in virtual environments is daunting due to a myriad of technical challenges, I hesitate to pay to attend meetings when I could instead devote time to my research. At the same time, by not participating, I fear that I will miss out on discoveries and that my own research will become less visible to the scientific community.

Live expert transcription during virtual conferences would solve these problems, but it is financially difficult because the frequent organization of meetings and the frequency with which they are rescheduled would require on-call transcription services. My hopes for the future rest on the continued development and widespread integration of automatic captioning technology powered by artificial intelligence. Unfortunately, not every tool I’ve tried so far has been able to handle scientific language effectively.

For now, I am primarily engaging in scientific discussions through written communications and rare face-to-face face-to-face meetings while following pandemic guidelines. In these uncertain and difficult times, I have no choice but to rely on the willingness of my peers to meet my needs and continue to support them, even when opportunities for scientific exchange are limited.

These support methods certainly require some extra effort, but taken together, their potential payoff is enormous. Many of the challenges that researchers with disabilities must overcome throughout their lives promote the development of above-average problem-solving abilities with creative thinking outside the box, which we can share with the entire scientific community.

Tips for supporting hearing-impaired scientists

– Provide many opportunities for one-on-one face-to-face meetings.

– Don’t limit communication to phone calls and rethink smoke and fire alarms.

– For Deaf instructors, having other teachers available during classes that focus on student engagement.

– During in-person conferences, consider close communication while facing your peers as both speaker and questioner.

– During virtual meetings, systematically include live transcription and assess how well it captures scientific language.

– Do not assume that low participation in groups means that an individual lacks academic skills or creativity.

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Kahoot: in the news of January 14 https://eartdocuments.com/kahoot-in-the-news-of-january-14/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 21:25:33 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/kahoot-in-the-news-of-january-14/ Host a virtual game night with these multiplayer apps– Megan Schaltegger, Thrillist For those planning a virtual game night to catch up with friends and family, Kahoot! can offer a new take on quiz sessions with a personal touch, says Megan Schaltegger for Thrillist. Classroom Breathers– Khan Academy Blog On February 1, Khan Academy will […]]]>

Host a virtual game night with these multiplayer apps– Megan Schaltegger, Thrillist

For those planning a virtual game night to catch up with friends and family, Kahoot! can offer a new take on quiz sessions with a personal touch, says Megan Schaltegger for Thrillist.

Classroom Breathers– Khan Academy Blog

On February 1, Khan Academy will host a live Kahoot! game where classes can test their knowledge and have fun together, with winners receiving special prizes for their class.

Consejos para sacarle jugo a Kahoot! Perfecto for online classes– El Sol de La Laguna (Spanish)

Kahoot! is touted as a platform that can help educators by making formative assessment easier and more engaging for students, with a question bank, ready-to-use learning content, and an easy-to-use authoring tool. use to design your own kahoots in minutes.

Announcing the Finalists, Judges and Emcees of the Student Launch and Startup Competition– Leslie Kelley, SXSW EDU

SXSW EDU features finalists, judges and hosts from their kickoff competition, including Co-Founder and CPO Dan Carroll of Clever and Craig Narveson, Director of Strategic Partnerships at Kahoot!, as event hosts

14 quick ways to improve your classroom technology– Matthew Lynch, Tech Advocate

For teachers who want to start incorporating more technology into their classroom, Matthew Lynch of The defender of technologyhighlights Kahoot! as a platform that facilitates student engagement in playful learning.

学校で使えるクイズアプリ「Kahoot!」で、子どもたち自身が問題を作る方法– EdTechZine (Japanese)

In the second episode of this Kahoot! series of guides, an elementary school teacher based in Saitama introduces his fellow educators in Japan to the features and functionality of Kahoot!, including how students can create their own kahoots.

Top 10 Self-Study Language Apps to Improve Your Communication Skills– Subhadrika Sen, TT-Edugraph

Kahoot’s Drops app! family of learning platforms – is recommended among the top 10 apps for language learning, highlighting its wide variety of languages ​​and its engaging and fun approach to self-learning.

These 21 online Spanish games will keep you busy for hours– Take lessons

For teachers and learners of all ages looking for an engaging way to support their Spanish language practice online, take lessonsrecommend Kahoot! as a popular platform that includes out-of-the-box Spanish content on almost any topic.

Link Download game Kahoot.it Android, iOS & Apa itu Kahoot.it ? and Bagaimana Cara Memainkannya?– Rivki Sazali, KlikKoran (Indonesian)

For educators, parents, and learners of all ages who want to bring more joy to learning, whether in the classroom or at home, Rivki Sazali at KlikQurantakes a look at the features offered by Kahoot! and gives a step-by-step guide to discovering and creating awesome learning experiences on the platform.

Kaj I apply Kahoot?– Žiga Kastelic, NaDlani.si (Slovenian)

readers of NaDlani.sican start using the Kahoot! mobile with this detailed introduction, including how it can be used to support learning and engagement at school, work, and home.

Please visit Kahoot! Newsto stay up to date on company news and updates.

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New science program implemented in Joplin school district | KSNF / KODE https://eartdocuments.com/new-science-program-implemented-in-joplin-school-district-ksnf-kode/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 01:34:42 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/new-science-program-implemented-in-joplin-school-district-ksnf-kode/ JOPLIN, Mo. – You may remember “See Spot Run” as a crucial step in learning to read.But the Joplin School District is taking a new approach, focusing on science and how young brains make the connection to literacy. It’s called “LETRS”, which stands for Language Essentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling. “Kids, how they […]]]>


JOPLIN, Mo. – You may remember “See Spot Run” as a crucial step in learning to read.
But the Joplin School District is taking a new approach, focusing on science and how young brains make the connection to literacy.

It’s called “LETRS”, which stands for Language Essentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling.

“Kids, how they learn, how their brains work,” said Melissa Kendall, McKinley Elementary.

Then use it to help them read the connection. This is the objective of the LETRS program.

“They have it, it’s not memorization. It’s not – oh, it has to be like that – it’s the real property of their abilities, ”Kendall said.

The scientific approach means that teachers start with the sounds of words and how they go together. Students listen to syllables and compound words.

“They’ll light up when they have a concept – you can just see it. “

The Joplin School District trains leaders in every elementary school. Once this is in place, these facilitators will pass on what they know to others on campus.

“Teachers are the most essential factor inside our classrooms. This is why our teachers who provide direct and explicit instruction to our students in the world of reading are critically important to our academic progress, ”said Sarah Mwangi, Deputy Superintendent of Joplin Schools.

The end goal is to improve student reading… and what comes next.

“This applies to all other subjects, the ability to read and write effectively is of critical importance to our students and their future. And so, the more knowledge we can acquire, and we can implement the way we fully anticipate that our scores will continue to increase and our students will be very successful, ”Mwangi added.

THE “LETRS” program is mainly aimed at children from kindergarten to grade 3. This can also apply to struggling readers in Grades 4 and 5, and potentially even students with special needs in high school.


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New principals at Blessed Sacrament and Cathedral optimistic about future of Catholic education in Lincoln | Education https://eartdocuments.com/new-principals-at-blessed-sacrament-and-cathedral-optimistic-about-future-of-catholic-education-in-lincoln-education/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 01:35:00 +0000 https://eartdocuments.com/new-principals-at-blessed-sacrament-and-cathedral-optimistic-about-future-of-catholic-education-in-lincoln-education/ So I went to Pius X High School, and taught a variety of things. And while I was there, I graduated in Educational Administration. I didn’t expect to switch to administration so soon. And, honestly, I never wanted to get into administration until I just had the opportunity to lead and I really enjoyed supporting […]]]>


So I went to Pius X High School, and taught a variety of things. And while I was there, I graduated in Educational Administration. I didn’t expect to switch to administration so soon. And, honestly, I never wanted to get into administration until I just had the opportunity to lead and I really enjoyed supporting the teachers. So I really loved it.

Miller: I am a product of the CCD (Confraternité de la doctrine chretienne, a program that provides Catholic education to students in public schools). I went to college in Sioux City, Iowa, Briar Cliff and played softball for a few years. I went back to UNL just to be closer to my family and got my bachelor’s degree in primary education. I taught for a year at St. Mary’s here in Lincoln. It just didn’t suit me, so I joined the public sector. And then I taught in college, I loved college. At one point, I was piloting a new writing program.

And someone said to me, “Have you thought about becoming, for example, an educational coach? And I said, “No, what is it?” So I obtained my first master’s degree in reading with the mention ELL (English language learner). So I got that, taught for another year, and then a teaching coach position opened up at Lakeview Elementary School. I got really involved in opening a family literacy program in Lakeview for non-English speaking families.


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